(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "City and County of San Francisco annual homeless count Homelessness"

GOVERNMENT 
DOCUMENTS DEPT 

JUN 2 9 2009 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 




2009 San Francisco 
Homeless Count and Survey 



Prepared by: 

San Francisco Human Services Agency with 
Applied Survey Research 




Human Services Agency 

Housing and Homeless Division 

Joyce Crum 

Program Director 

P.O. Box 7988 

San Francisco, CA 94120 

(415) 557-6444 



<*ASR 



Applied Survey Research 

Santa Cruz Office 

P.O. Box 1927, Watsonville, CA 95077 

(831)728-1356 



San Jose Office 

991 West Hedding, Suite 102, San Jose, CA 95126 

(408)247-8319 

www.appliedsurveyresearch.org 



GOVERNMENT 
DOCUMENTS DEPT 

JUL - 2 2009 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 






I 
I 
I 
I 

I 

I 
I 
I 
I 



3 1223 08678 8511 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Acknowledgements 



Acknowledgements 



The 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count planning team would like to thank the many individuals 
and agencies who contributed their considerable talents and efforts to the count. The participation 
of partner agencies and volunteers is critical to the success of the count, from the initial planning 
meetings, to the night of the count, and through the final stages of the project. Hundreds of 
community volunteers and City staff assisted with various aspects of the count, including revising 
volunteer instructions, media outreach and publicity, coordinating the dispatch centers, 
enumeration, data entry, and surveying. 

The San Francisco Local Homeless Coordinating Board (LHCB), the coordinating body for San 
Francisco's Continuum of Care, provided assistance for the 2009 Homeless Count project. We 
thank the members of the LHCB for their valued input and guidance. Meetings of the LHCB also 
served as a forum for stakeholder and community input on the project. 

We thank Judith Klain of Project Homeless Connect for publicizing the count through their 
website and e-mail list serves and assisting with volunteer recruitment. We also thank the 
numerous non-profit agencies and City Departments that mobilized their staff and community 
volunteers to participate on the night of the Count. 

We thank the following City agencies for the work in the planning efforts and implementation of 
the count: Human Services Agency, Department of Public Health, Mayor's Office, General 
Services Administration. Office of City Administrator, Department of Public Works. Recreation 
and Park Department, and San Francisco Police Department. In particular, we would like to thank 
the following individuals for their time and effort dedicated to planning the count: Dariush Kayhan, 
Joyce Crum, Daryl Higashi, John Murray. Sarah Crow, Tasha Spencer, Lt. Mark Solomon, Cpt. 
Dominic Panina, Rajesh Parekh. Rann Parker. Edwin Lee, Cheryl Koel, and Frank Lee. 

We also thank the California Highway Patrol for coordinating the enumeration of homeless 
persons on highway underpasses and on-ramps. 

We thank Centro Latino, St. Ignatius High School, the United Council of Human Services, and 
the San Francisco Department of Public Health for lending the use of their facilities as dispatch 
centers on the night of the Count. 

We thank Safeway for generously providing refreshments for the volunteers. 

We thank Pamela Tebo. Human Services Agency, for assisting with media coordination on the 
night of the count. 

We thank the following agencies for providing data for the sheltered count: 
Shelters 



St. Joseph 's Family Shelter 
Central City Hospitality House 
A Woman 's Place 
Compass Family Center 
The Sanctuary 
Next Door 



Hamilton Family Emergency Shelter 

Hamilton Family Residences 

Huckleberry House 

Dolores Street 

La Casa de Las Madres 

Lark Inn for Youth 



Diamond Youth Shelter 

Providence 

Raphael House 

MSC South 

150 Otis St. 

Bethel AME (Winter) 

Interfaith (Winter) 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



Acknowledgements 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Transitional Housing Programs 

A Woman's Place 

Clara House 

Washburn Hotel 

Hamilton Transitional 

Housing Program 

Larkin St. Avenues to 

Independence 

Castro Youth Housing 

Initiative 



The LOFT (Larkin) 
LEASE (Larkin) 
Harbor House 
Brennan House 
Transitional Living for 
Chronic Vets 
Transitional Living for 
Homeless Vets 
Jelani House 



Harbor Light 
Richmond Hills 
Walden House Programs 
La Casa Mariposa 
SafeHousefor Women 
Salvation Army Railton Place 
Larkin Street After Care 
Larkin Street Assisted Care 



Jail 

San Francisco County Jail 

Hospitals 
St Mary's 
St Francis 

Veterans Administration 
Hospital 

Treatment Programs 
Acceptance Place 
Joe Healy Detox 
Ferguson Place 
Baker St. House 
Grove St 
Joe Ruffin Place 

Resource Centers 
150 Otis St. 
Tenderloin Health 



California Pacific Medical 

Center 

Kaiser 

SF General Hospital 



Robertson Place 

San Jose Place 

Langley Porter (Psych. Inpatient) 

St. Francis (Psych. Inpatient) 

SF General Hospital (Psych. 

Inpatient) 



Respite Center at Next Door 
Respite Center at 39 Fell 



CPMC (Psych. Inpatient) 

SF General Hospital ED Case 

Management (Stabilization 

rooms) 

Jelani House Treatment 



Oshun Center for Women 

United Council of Human Services 



A team of trained currently and formerly homeless survey workers and community volunteers 
administered surveys on the streets of San Francisco. We thank them for their excellent work. 

We thank the staff of the Planning Unit of the Human Services Agency for providing feedback 
and assistance to the team throughout the project including the design and production of maps for 
the unsheltered count, project methodology, survey development, data entry coordination, review 
of this report, and the presentation of findings. 

We thank the planning team leads from the Human Services Agency - Daryl Higashi and Ali 
Schlageter - for all their work on the project. 

This report was compiled and written by Applied Survey Research and Ali Schlageter, Liaison to 
the Local Homeless Coordinating Board. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Table of Contents 



Table of Contents 



Acknowledgements i 

I. Executive Summary 1 

II. Introduction 5 

III. Planning Process 7 

Community Involvement 7 

Interagency Coordination 7 

IV. Methodology 9 

Unsheltered Count 9 

Volunteer Recruitment and Training 10 

Dispatch 11 

Who Was Counted 11 

Geographical Areas Covered 11 

Logistics of Counting 12 

Safety 13 

Sheltered Count 13 

Survey 15 

Planning and Implementation 15 

Survey Sampling 16 

Data Collection 16 

Data Integrity 16 

Survey Methodological Improvements from 2007 17 

V. Data Results 19 

Number of Homeless People 19 

Unsheltered Count 19 

Sheltered Count 22 

Survey Results .' 24 

Survey Implications 41 

VI. Limitations 43 

Unsheltered Count Limitations 43 

Sheltered Count Limitations 45 

Survey Limitations 46 

VII. Conclusion 47 

Appendix A: Volunteer Instructions 51 

Appendix B: Tally Sheet 55 

Appendix C: Survey Instrument 57 

Appendix D: Survey Results 61 

Appendix E: Survey Administration Detail 77 

Appendix F: Map of Supervisor Districts and Homeless Count Routes 79 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



fable of Figures 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Table of Figures 

Figure 1: 2009 Homeless Count Results and Comparisons with 2007, 2005, and 2002 3 

Figure 2: 2009 Unsheltered Count Results by Supervisor District: Gender and Race / Ethnicity 20 

Figure 3: 2009 Unsheltered Homeless Count Results by Supervisor District: Family Status, Age, and Estimated 

Number of Homeless Persons Living in Cars, RVs/Vans, and Structures 21 

Figure 4: Unsheltered Count Results Comparison 2000-2009 22 

Figure 5: 2009 Sheltered and Unsheltered Count Results and Comparisons to 2007 and 2005 23 

Figure 6: Demographic Data: Emergency Shelter and Transitional Housing Residents, January 27, 2009 24 

Figure 7: Race / Ethnicity of Survey Respondents and General Population of San Francisco 25 

Figure 8: Residence When Respondent Became Homeless : 27 

Figure 9: Length of Homelessness 28 

Figure 10: In the Last 12 Months, How Many Times Have You Been Homeless, Including this Present Time? 29 

Figure 11: In the Last 3 Years, How Many Times Have You Been Homeless, Including this Present Time? 29 

Figure 12: Chronically Homeless Survey Respondents 30 

Figure 13: Where Do You Usually Stay at Night? (Top 5 Responses from Chronically Homeless Persons) 30 

Figure 14: Services / Assistance Used by Chronically Homeless Persons (Top 5 Responses) 31 

Figure 15: Where Do You Usually Stay at Night? 32 

Figure 16: Nighttime Accommodation - Comparison of Selected Data from 2007 and 2009 33 

Figure 17: Primary Event / Condition that Led to Homelessness 34 

Figure 18: What is Keeping You from Getting Permanent Housing? (Top 5 Responses*) 35 

Figure 19: What is Keeping You from Getting Employment? (Top 5 Responses) 36 

Figure 20: Reasons for Not Receiving Government Assistance (Top 5 Responses) 37 

Figure 21: Services / Assistance Currently Being Used by Respondents (Top 5 Responses) 37 

Figure 22: Do You Panhandle, or Ask People for Money or Spare Change? 38 

Figure 23: Do You Usually Get Enough to Eat on a Daily Basis? 41 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



I. Executive Summary 



I. Executive Summary 




The 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count was a community-wide effort that took place on the 
night of January 27, 2009. The count provides information about the homeless population that is 
critical to program and service planning, helps to inform the allocation of resources for services to 
help the homeless, and offers a means of measuring the impact of homeless programs and 
services. In addition, it is required by the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development (HUD) as part of a national 
effort to enumerate the homeless population. All jurisdictions 
receiving federal funding to provide housing and services for 
the homeless through the McKinney-Vento Homeless 
Assistance Grant are required to conduct a biennial point-in- 
time count of unsheltered and sheltered homeless persons 
sometime during the last ten days of January. This information 
helps the federal government better understand the nature and 
extent of homelessness nationwide. The data presented in this 
report provide an updated point-in-time snapshot of the 
homeless population in San Francisco. The purpose of this 
report is to share the results of the count with the community, to 
provide a discussion of the methodology used, and to offer 
analysis of the findings. 

The McKinney-Vento definition of homelessness was used as the basis for this study: 

1. An individual who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, and 

2. An individual who has a primary nighttime residence that is: 

a. A supervised publicly or privately operated shelter designed to provide 
temporary living accommodations (including welfare hotels, congregate shelters, 
and transitional housing for the mentally ill); or 

b. An institution that provides a temporary residence for individuals intended to 
be institutionalized; or 

c. A public or private place not designated for, or ordinarily used as, a regular 
sleeping accommodation for human beings. 

This definition does not allow for the inclusion of those who are marginally housed, "doubled 
up," or "couch surfing/" 

As in 2007, the 2009 count once again involved hundreds of community volunteers in a city wide 
enumeration effort, covering every area of the City to achieve the most accurate count possible of 

all individuals living on the streets on the night of the 
count. Staff from various City departments and the 
California Highway Patrol assisted with the enumeration 
of City parks and highway on-ramps and underpasses. 



The 2009 count involved hundreds 
of community volunteers in a 
citywide enumeration effort. 



In complement to the unsheltered count, the City 
conducted a count of sheltered homeless persons in 

emergency shelters and transitional housing programs and persons self-identifying as homeless 

who were staying at other facilities on the night of the count. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Finally, a survey of homeless individuals administered primarily in outdoor locations throughout 
the City was also conducted to gather information about the homeless population's demographics, 
family status, causes of homelessness, length and recurrence of homelessness, usual nighttime 
accommodations, and access to homeless services. The surveys were conducted by a trained team 
of paid, currently and formerly homeless survey workers and unpaid community volunteers. 

While maintaining a consistent methodology in order to generate comparable data, this year's 
count included improvements to the survey component. In addition, there were enhancements to 
the unsheltered and sheltered counts, including an improved methodology for enumerating those 
living in vehicles and encampments; a substantial increase in the use of trained outreach workers 
to assist community volunteers in counting unsheltered homeless persons; and the inclusion of 
additional stabilization room units and one more resource center in the 2009 sheltered count, 
compared to the 2007 sheltered count. 

The total number of homeless persons counted in the City and County of San Francisco on 
January 27, 2009 was 6,514. This constituted a 25% decrease from 2002. The following chart 
provides a comparison of the results of the 2009, 2007, 
2005, and 2002 counts. It is important to note, however, 
that the counts prior to 2007 did not employ the city wide 
enumeration method. Comparing the 2007 and 2009 
results, on the surface it appears that there has been 
minimal or no change in San Francisco's homeless 
population over the past two years. However, the lack of 

change in the overall size of the homeless population obscures the significant progress that has 
been made in getting individuals into needed treatment programs and transitioning individuals out 
of homelessness and into stable housing, which has dramatically improved many lives. In the past 
few years, San Francisco has applied more innovation and resources to ending homelessness than 
any time in its history. From January 2004 to February 2009, 5,497 single homeless adults were 
placed in permanent supportive housing through Care Not Cash Housing, Housing First, Direct 
Access to Housing, Shelter Plus Care, and the Local Operating Subsidy Program. During this 
time span, another 3,646 homeless individuals left San Francisco to be reunited with friends or 

family members in other parts of the country through 
the City's Homeward Bound Program. In addition, 
705 individuals on public assistance secured housing 
on their own. From 2004 through February 2009, a 
total of 9,143 individuals exited homelessness through 
various initiatives. 



In the past few years, San Francisco 

has applied more innovation and 

resources to ending homelessness 

than any time in its history. 




San Francisco remains a destination for homeless 
persons from other areas, inhibiting the City's 
progress toward reducing the overall homeless 
population. Thirty-eight percent (38%) of homeless 
individuals surveyed reported that they first became 
homeless outside of San Francisco or were relative 
newcomers, having lived in the City for three months or less. The most prevalent primary reason 
for coming to San Francisco, among those who became homeless outside of the City, was "for a 
job / seeking work" (24%). The next most common primary reasons for coming to the City 
among this group were "my family and / or friends are here" and "I visited and decided to stay" 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



I. Executive Summary 



(15% each). In addition, 12% of these respondents indicated that they came to San Francisco "to 
access homeless services." 

The 2009 count demonstrated that the City's continued progress in reducing homelessness since 
late-2002 has been sustained, through the many programs and efforts discussed. As previously 
stated, in 2009, homelessness was 25% lower overall than in 2002, and the street homeless 
population was reduced by 40%. 



Figure 1: 


2009 Homeless Count Results and Comparisons with 2007, 2005, and 2002 










Single 

Adults 

2009 


Persons 

in 

Families 

2009 


Family 

Status 

Unknown 

2009 


Single 

Adults 

2007 


Persons 

in 

Families 

2007 


Family 

Status 

Unknown 

2007 


2009 
Totals 


2007 
Totals 


2005 
Totals 


2002 
Totals 


Street 


1,269 


25 


1,415 


1,935 


66 


770 


2,709 


2,771 


2,655 


4,535 


Emergency Shelter 


1,206 


310 





1,175 


322 





1,516 


1,497 


1,754 


2,308 


Transitional 
Housing & 
Treatment Centers 


1,047 


210 





1,076 


190 





1,257 


1,266 


1,141 


1,365 


Resource Centers 
& Stabilization 


540 








321 








540 


321 


192 


331 


Jail 


394 








400 








394 


400 


415 


Not 

reported 


Hospitals 


94 


4 





122 








98 


122 


91 


101 


Total 


4,550 


549 


1,415 


5,029 


578 


770 


6,514 


6,377 


6,248 


8,640 



Source: San Francisco Human Services Agency, 2009 San Francisco Unsheltered Homeless Count, 2009 San Francisco Human 
Services Agency and Abbott Little Consulting, San Francisco 2007 Homeless Count, 2007 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



I. Executive Summary 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



II. Introduction 



II. Introduction 

The 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count was a community-wide effort that took place on the 
night of January 27, 2009. The count provides information about the homeless population that is 
critical to program and service planning, helps to inform the allocation of resources for services to 
help the homeless, and offers a means of measuring the impact of homeless programs and 

services. In addition, it is required by the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development (HUD) as part of a 
national effort to enumerate the homeless population. 



The count provides information 

about the homeless population 

that is critical to program and 

service planning. 



All jurisdictions receiving federal funding to provide 
housing and services for the homeless through the 
McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Grant are 
required to conduct a biennial point-in-time count of unsheltered and sheltered homeless persons 
sometime during the last ten days of January. Currently San Francisco receives $19.8 million in 
Homeless Assistance Grant money. This is a critical source of funding for the City and County 
budget for homeless services. 

Per the guidelines set forth by HUD, the point-in-time count must include all unsheltered 
homeless persons and sheltered homeless persons staying in emergency shelters and transitional 
housing programs on the date of the count. Jurisdictions report the findings of their point- in-time 
count in their annual application to HUD for federal funding to provide housing and services for 
the homeless. The compilation of data collected through point-in-time counts across the United 
States helps the federal government to better understand 
the nature and extent of homelessness nationwide. 

Approximately 425 community volunteers canvassed 

the streets of San Francisco in teams on January 27th 

between 8 p.m. and midnight to visually count 

unsheltered homeless individuals living outdoors, in 

vehicles, in makeshift structures or encampments, and 

in other structures or areas not intended for human 

habitation. For the count of sheltered homeless persons. 

staff of emergency shelters, drop-in centers, transitional housing programs, mental health 

facilities, treatment centers, the County jail, and City hospitals counted the number of homeless 

sheltered at their facility on the night of the count. The unsheltered count was scheduled after 

shelter curfews took effect in order to avoid duplicate counting. 

A non-intrusive, point-in-time, visual enumeration method, while HUD approved and 
academically sound, has some inherent biases and shortcomings, which could result in the 
undercount of the homeless population, particularly those subsets of the homeless population that 
stay in places not easily or safely accessible by enumerators, such as private property and 
abandoned structures. Nonetheless, the count provides a homeless population estimate for San 
Francisco that is used by City and County staff to plan programs and allocate resources to better 
serve the homeless population. 

While maintaining a consistent methodology in order to generate comparable data, there were 
enhancements to the 2009 unsheltered and sheltered counts, including an improved methodology 
for enumerating those living in vehicles and encampments; a substantial increase in the use of 




© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



II. Introduction 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



trained outreach workers to assist community volunteers in counting unsheltered homeless 
persons; and the inclusion of additional stabilization room units and one more resource center in 
the sheltered count. In addition, this year's count included improvements to the survey 
component. A trained team of paid, currently and formerly homeless survey workers and unpaid 
community volunteers administered the survey to self-identifying homeless individuals, primarily 
in outdoor locations throughout the City. The survey elicited information about the homeless 
population's demographics, history of homelessness, living conditions, barriers to overcoming 
homelessness, and use of homeless services. 

This report details the process of planning the count, the methodology, and the findings and 
limitations of the data. It also provides analysis, conclusions, and a contextualized interpretation 
of the findings, within the overarching framework of homeless services offered in San Francisco. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



III. Planning Process 



Planning Process 



To ensure the success of the count, several City and community agencies collaborated in the areas 
of community outreach, volunteer recruitment, logistical planning, methodological decision- 
making, and interagency coordination. Applied Survey Research (ASR), a non-profit social 
research firm based in Santa Cruz County, provided technical assistance with these aspects of the 
planning process. ASR has over ten years of experience conducting homeless counts and surveys 
throughout California and across the nation. Their work is featured as a best practice in HUD's 
publication, A Guide to Counting Unsheltered Homeless People. 

Community Involvement 

Local homeless service providers and advocates have been active and valued partners in the 
planning and implementation of previous homeless counts. The planning team invited public 
input on a number of aspects of the count, including the proposed methodology, volunteer 
orientation, and recruitment and participation of homeless workers in survey administration. The 
Local Homeless Coordinating Board (LHCB), the lead entity of San Francisco's Continuum of 
Care, was invited to comment on the methodology, and subsequently endorsed it. The LHCB was 
also the primary venue to collect public feedback. The count was discussed at two LHCB 
meetings, and a separate community meeting was held to gather public input. 



Interagency Coordination 



In the early stages of the planning process, the planning team - comprised of staff from the 
Human Services Agency's Housing and Homeless Division, the Liaison to the Local Homeless 
Coordinating Board, and private consultants from Applied 
Survey Research - requested the collaboration, cooperation, and 
participation of several government agencies that regularly 
interact with homeless individuals and possess considerable 
knowledge and expertise relevant to the planning of a 
comprehensive count. In November 2008. the planning team 
organized an initial planning meeting including representatives 
of the San Francisco Police Department, the Department of 
Public Health, the Recreation and Park Department, the 
Department of Public Works, the Mayor's Office, the Office of 
City Administrator, and the Fully Integrated Recovery Services 
Team (SF FIRST), formerly the Homeless Outreach Team. The 

planning team requested the participation and input of these agencies in four key areas related to 
the unsheltered count: the recruitment and mobilization of volunteers among City staff, the 
identification of "hotspots" for homelessness throughout the City, the recruitment of staff to 
enumerate homeless individuals in City parks, and the provision of volunteer safety training and 
security detail on the night of the count. The planning team convened a series of more detail- 
focused meetings to coordinate the logistics of the unsheltered count and the park count with 
agency representatives in the following months. The planning team convened a final meeting of 
all agency representatives on January 7, 2009, during which the group reviewed and finalized all 
plans for the count. 



4to* 

1 1 




-ukiMM 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



III. Planning Process 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



IV. Methodology 



IV. Methodology 



San Francisco's 2009 census and survey of its homeless population was comprised of the 
following components: 

1. Unsheltered Count: A visual point-in-time count of unsheltered homeless persons living 
outdoors, in vehicles, in makeshift structures or encampments, and in other structures or areas 
not intended for human habitation, conducted over a four-hour time window (8 p.m. to 
midnight) on the night of January 27, 2009. 

2. Sheltered Count: Per HUD requirements, an enumeration of homeless individuals residing in 
emergency shelters and transitional housing on the date of the count. In addition, San 
Francisco counted homeless individuals temporarily living in jails, hospitals, and mental 
health and drug treatment facilities on the night of the count; however, these individuals are 
not reported to HUD for the point-in-time count, as they fall outside the McKinney-Vento 
definition of homelessness. 

3. Survey: A survey of homeless individuals followed the count, taking place over a three week 
period in February. A trained team of paid, currently and formerly homeless survey workers 
and unpaid community volunteers administered a 
comprehensive survey to self-identifying homeless 
individuals, primarily in outdoor locations throughout the 
City. The survey elicited information about the homeless 
population's demographics, history of homelessness, living 
conditions, barriers to overcoming homelessness, and use 
of homeless services. The survey team employed a random 
selection process, approaching every third person they 

considered to be eligible for the survey. 1 Overall, 95% of individuals approached agreed to 
participate in the survey. The survey team successfully completed surveys with 534 
individuals encountered across all of San Francisco's supervisorial districts. 

HUD requires the submittal of point-in-time homeless count data with Continuum of Care 
Homeless Assistance funding applications, typically due in May or June each year. 




Unsheltered Count 



In devising the methodology for the count, the planning team drew upon recognized best 

practices as detailed in HUD's publication, A Guide to 
Counting Unsheltered Homeless People. Overall, the 
approach used in the 2009 unsheltered count was 
consistent with the methodology used in 2007, in order 
to generate comparable data. However, this year's count 
included methodological improvements in the 



In devising the methodology for the 

count, the planning team drew 

upon recognized best practices as 

detailed in HUD's publication. 



1 This method of selecting every third person was an attempt to eliminate bias in the selection of survey respondents. Because 
the exact size and composition of the overall population of homeless persons is unknown, it is possible that not every eligible 
person was considered in the selection of respondents. However, given the knowledge of the homeless population available to 
the survey team (the majority of whom were currently or formerly homeless individuals), it was a random respondent selection 
process. This approach of interviewing every nth person encountered is recommended by HUD in their publication A Guide to 
Counting Unsheltered Homeless People, revised 2008 (p.37). 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



IV. Methodology 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



enumeration of persons living in vehicles and encampments and a substantial increase in the use 
of trained outreach workers to assist community volunteers in counting the street homeless 
population. 

As in 2007, San Francisco employed a "simple street count" methodology, by which teams of 
volunteers canvassed all areas of the City to directly observe persons in non-shelter, non-service, 
public locations. Because the same methodology was used, the results from 2009 and 2007 are 
directly comparable. This is a more comprehensive approach than the 2005 methodology, when 
the point-in-time count focused enumeration efforts on attaining complete coverage of densely 
populated and commercial areas, with selected coverage of identified "hotspots" in more sparsely 
populated and residential areas. 



Volunteer Recruitment and Training 

Again this year, many individuals who live or work in San Francisco turned out to support the 
City' s effort to enumerate the local homeless population. Approximately 425 community 
volunteers participated in the 2009 unsheltered count. The Human Services Agency (HSA) 
spearheaded the volunteer recruitment effort. Extensive outreach efforts were conducted, 
targeting local non-profits that serve the homeless and local volunteer programs. 



Many individuals who live or work in 

San Francisco turned out to support the 

City's effort to enumerate the local 

homeless population. 



Project Homeless Connect publicized the upcoming 
count and promoted volunteer participation through 
an e-mail to its volunteer base and an event posting 
on its website. The Local Homeless Coordinating 
Board (LHCB), the Continuum of Care oversight 
body for San Francisco, also promoted community 
participation in the count at all general meetings and 
subcommittee meetings for several months leading up to the count. The LHCB also posted an 
announcement and additional information about the count on its website and on the Craigslist 
website. 

The planning committee sent a press release informing the community about the count and 
making an appeal for volunteer participation to media outlets approximately two weeks before the 
count. Volunteers registered to participate, and received additional details on the count, via a 
telephone hotline and dedicated SFGOV email account monitored and staffed by Applied Survey 
Research (ASR) support staff. 

Hundreds of volunteers served as enumerators on the night of the count, canvassing the City in 
teams to visually count homeless persons in street locations. Volunteers also provided staffing 
support at the four dispatch centers, greeting volunteers, distributing instructions, maps, and 
equipment to enumeration teams, collecting data sheets from returning teams, and performing 
data entry as teams returned with their findings. 

In order to participate in the count, all volunteers were required to attend a one-hour training 
preceding the count on January 27, 2009, from 7 to 8 p.m. In addition to the presentation given by 
the lead staff at the dispatch center, volunteers received printed instructions detailing how to 
count unsheltered homeless persons (see Appendix A). San Francisco Police Department officers 
provided a safety briefing to the volunteers and provided security at the dispatch centers 
throughout the night. Additional safety measures for the volunteers included the deployment of an 
experienced SF FIRST outreach worker with teams enumerating high density areas and the 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



IV. Methodology 



provision of flashlights and fluorescent safety vests to walking enumeration teams. 
Approximately 35 outreach workers assisted on the night of the count, more than three times the 
number that participated in 2007. 



Dispatch 

To achieve complete coverage of the City within the four hour timeframe, the planning team 
identified four areas for the placement of dispatch centers on the night of the count - the 
Downtown (Central City), Mission, Sunset, and Bayview Districts. Volunteers selected their 
dispatch center at the time of registration, based on familiarity with the area or convenience. The 
planning team divided up the enumeration routes and assigned them to the dispatch center closest 
or most central to the coverage area to facilitate the timely deployment of enumeration teams into 
the field. 

Who Was Counted 

In the volunteer training presentation and accompanying materials, volunteers were instructed on 
the criteria for determining whether to count an individual as homeless. The following behaviors 
and conditions, either alone or in combination, were points for consideration: 

Walking or standing "with no purpose" (loitering) 

Panhandling (with or without cup / sign) 

Carrying bags, backpacks, garbage bags, suitcases, blankets, and / or bedrolls 

With shopping cart containing personal belongings 

Recycling, especially large numbers of items 

Sleeping on the street 

Disheveled 

Inebriated / passed out on sidewalk 

For safety reasons, the trainers instructed volunteers not to enter abandoned buildings, which may 
be structurally unsound and / or sites of illegal activity. Enumerators received special instructions 
for counting those living in vehicles, tents, and other makeshift dwellings (see Appendix A). 
Volunteers tallied the number of such vehicles and dwellings seen, without disturbing the 
occupant(s). An estimate of the number of individuals living in these vehicles, tents, and other 
makeshift dwellings was calculated using data on the average number of occupants of such 
accommodations from the subsequent survey. 



Geographical Areas Covered 

As in 2007. the 2009 unsheltered count included all areas of 

the City without exception. In the course of planning the 

count, the planning team deemed highway on-ramps and 

selected parks unsafe for nighttime enumeration by volunteers. 

These areas were not included in the routes canvassed by 

volunteer teams. To count the parks, the Recreation and Park 

Department (Rec / Park), the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD), and the Fully Integrated 



The unsheltered count included 

all areas of the City without 

exception. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



IV. Methodology 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 




Recovery Services Team (SF FIRST), in collaboration with the Human Services Agency (HSA), 
reviewed and updated the plan developed for the 2007 count for enumerating homeless 
individuals present in the parks while prioritizing the safety of the volunteers and the accuracy of 
the count. 

The plan for counting the parks divided the City's parks into three categories, assigning each 
category of parks a specific enumeration strategy. Parks considered too big and / or densely 
wooded to inspect safely and accurately in the dark on the night of the count were classified as 
Category 1 parks. There were approximately 34 Category 1 parley including Golden Gate Park. 
Teams comprised of SFPD personnel and SF FIRST staff counted individuals identified as 
homeless in Golden Gate Park in the early morning of Wednesday, January 28, 2009. The 
remaining Category 1 Parks were grouped by SFPD 
District. In each SFPD district, SFPD staff and Rec / 
Park staff enumerated all the Category 1 Parks in their 
respective district on the morning of Wednesday, 
January 28, 2009. 

Parks located in dangerous areas or encompassing 

remote or hidden areas unsafe for nighttime 

enumeration by volunteers were classified as Category 

2 parks. There were approximately 29 Category 2 

parks. Teams including one SFPD staff member and 

one Rec / Park supervisor counted all the Category 2 Parks in their assigned SFPD district on the 

night of the count. 

Those parks considered small and safe enough for accurate nighttime enumeration by volunteers 
were classified as Category 3. These approximately 95 Category 3 parks were included in the 
volunteer enumeration routes. In the training, volunteers were instructed to count homeless 
individuals located in the park from the street or park perimeter. Parks located within a volunteer 
enumeration route were clearly marked to indicate whether they were to be counted by the 
volunteer team or were being counted by SFPD / Rec / Park teams. Parks that are locked at night 
were not included in the count. 

For the safety of the volunteers, highway on-ramps and surrounding landscaped areas were 
excluded from volunteer enumeration routes. The California Highway Patrol counted the 
homeless individuals living in these locations on January 27, 2009 and reported the numbers the 
following morning. 

This approach to counting homeless individuals in the City's parks and around highway on- 
ramps, devised in 2007 and updated in 2009, was a departure from the methodology employed in 
2005, when Golden Gate Park was enumerated solely by Rec / Park without the assistance of the 
SFPD or SF FIRST, other parks were only counted by volunteers from the periphery of the parks, 
and areas near highway on-ramps were not counted. 



Logistics of Counting 

The planning team divided the City into 151 enumeration routes (see Appendix F for a map of the 
enumeration routes). Volunteers canvassed routes of approximately 6 to 30 blocks in teams of 
two to six volunteers. Walking teams canvassed routes in commercial areas and other locations 
known to include sizable homeless populations, while driving teams counted more sparsely 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



IV. Methodology 



populated and residential areas by a combination of driving and walking. Each team received a 
map, which demarcated the area to be canvassed and clearly showed the boundaries of the 
counting area. Two smaller inset maps showed the approximate location of the route within the 
broader context of the City and pinpointed the location of known hotspots for homelessness. 
Dispatch center volunteers provided each team with tally sheets to tally homeless persons 
observed and record basic demographic and location information (see Appendix B: Tally Sheet 
for more information). Dispatch center volunteers also verified that at least one person on each 
team had a cell phone available for their use during the count and recorded the number on the 
volunteer deployment log sheet. 

As in 2007, teams canvassing densely populated areas 

with known large populations of homeless persons 

were accompanied by experienced outreach workers 

from SF FIRST, a trained outreach team that works 

with the local homeless population year-round. SF 

FIRST members provided volunteers with valuable 

guidance on where and how to look for homeless 

persons and assisted the team in determining whom to 

count. Because of their familiarity with these areas and the local homeless population, SF FIRST 

members also helped to assure the safety of the volunteers. 




Safety 



SFPD coordinated the planning and implementation of safety measures on the night of the count, 
to minimize risks to the volunteers. The safety measures included the following: 

1 . SFPD officers provided safety training to volunteers at each of four dispatch centers and 
served as the call responder if any volunteer needed assistance. 

2. SFPD enlisted the cooperation of CHP officers in counting homeless persons who lived near 
or on highway on-ramps and underpasses. 

3. As noted above. SFPD officers partnered with Recreation and Park Department staff to 
canvass parks considered too densely wooded or otherwise dangerous for enumeration by 
volunteers. 



Sheltered Count 



The homeless occupancy of the following shelters and institutions was collected for the night of 
January 27, 2009. These individuals self-identified as being homeless. 

HUD requires that individuals staying in the following facilities be included in the point-in-time 
count: 

• Emergency shelters. Twenty emergency shelters reported occupancy numbers for the 
night of the count. 

• Transitional housing. Twenty-one transitional housing programs provided a count of 
the number of residents at their facility on the night of the count. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



• Resource centers. Four resource centers (drop-in service sites) in operation during the 
point-in-time count provided information. 

• Stabilization rooms. SF FIRST provided the number of homeless individuals in 
stabilization rooms - temporary program rooms in single room occupancy hotels used 
to provide intensive case management services to the most vulnerable and chronic of 
the street homeless population. Eligibility for this program, managed by SF FIRST, 
includes the ability to follow a case management plan to move toward stability. 
Stabilization rooms were included in the 2007 count, but since then the City's stock 
of stabilization rooms has increased by 150 rooms; these additional rooms were also 
included in the 2009 count. 

While HUD does not include counts of the homeless individuals in hospitals, residential 
rehabilitation facilities, and jails in the reportable numbers for the point-in-time count, these 
facilities are included in San Francisco's sheltered count because these individuals meet San 
Francisco's local definition of homelessness and the numbers provide important supplemental 
information for the community and service providers in their service planning efforts. 

The following facilities participated in the count: 

• Mental health facilities and substance abuse treatment centers. The Department of 
Public Health and local agencies assisted in collecting counts of self-identified 
homeless persons staying in various facilities on the 
night of January 27, 2009. These census numbers 
included inpatient psychiatric services, Acute 
Diversion Units, medically-assisted and social model 
detoxification facilities, and residential drug 
treatment facilities. Ten treatment agencies / 
programs submitted numbers. 

• Jail. The San Francisco Sheriffs Department 
provided a count of the number of homeless persons 
in the County jail on the night of January 27, 2009. 

• Hospitals. The San Francisco Hospital Council 
assisted with the coordination of obtaining census 
numbers from the hospitals. Staff from individual hospitals collected the number of 
persons who were homeless in their facilities on the night of January 27, 2009. The 
numbers reported for the hospitals did not duplicate the inpatient mental health units. 
Six local hospitals responded with their numbers, and two respite centers also 
provided numbers. 

A designated staff person provided the census count for each of these facilities; clients were not 
interviewed. For the emergency shelters, transitional housing programs, resource centers, and 
stabilization rooms, all persons in the facility on the night of the count were included in the 
census because these are homeless-specific programs. For the hospitals and treatment centers, 
social workers or appropriate staff counted patients who identified as homeless. The San 
Francisco County Jail used an estimation to arrive at their census number, as discussed in the data 
results section. 




© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



IV. Methodology 



Demographic data on the sheltered homeless population staying in emergency shelters and 
transitional housing were gathered from shelter providers by HSA at the time of the sheltered 
count, in compliance with HUD requirements. HUD also mandates the collection of 
subpopulation data in these facilities, including the number of people who are: 

• Chronically homeless, 

• Experiencing severe mental illness, 

• Experiencing substance abuse, 

• Veterans, 

• Domestic violence victims, and 

• Unaccompanied youth. 

Clients were identified in one or more categories, as applicable. 

Demographic data were not collected on persons counted at the resource centers, stabilization 
rooms, treatment centers, hospitals, or jail. 



Survey 



Planning and implementation 

The survey of homeless persons was conducted to gather qualitative data about the homeless 
community. These data were used in the application for McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance 
federal funding. In addition, the qualitative data are important for homeless program development 

and planning. The survey elicited information such as 
demographics, family status, causes of homelessness, 
length and recurrence of homelessness. usual nighttime 
accommodations, and access to homeless services 
through closed-ended and multiple response questions. 
The survey data bring greater perspective to current 
issues of homelessness. and the provision and delivery 
of services. The collection of survey data provides a benchmark for tracking changes in the living 
and economic conditions of the local homeless population for future homeless studies. 



The survey data bring greater 

perspective to current issues of 

homelessness, and the provision 

and delivery of services. 



The survey team included seven currently or formerly homeless individuals, who were referred 
by local service providers, and two community volunteers. All members of the survey team 
completed an orientation training session with Applied Survey Research staff, which included 
project background information and detailed instruction on respondent eligibility, randomized 
survey sampling, interviewing protocol, and confidentiality. The survey tool was reviewed in 
detail. 

The survey was administered over a three-week period in February. Homeless workers were 
compensated at a rate of $5.00 per survey completed. Community volunteers conducted surveys 
on an unpaid basis. All surveys were reviewed by HSA staff to ensure completeness and 
authenticity. (For additional details on survey administration, see Appendix E.) To promote 
participation in the survey, HSA provided ten-minute phone cards to be offered as an incentive 
gift to survey respondents in appreciation for their time and participation. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



IV. Methodology 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Survey Sampling 



To survey a broad cross-section of the local homeless population, members of the survey team 
were instructed to employ a random selection process, in which survey workers identified 
possible respondents and approached every third person to administer the survey. The survey 
team documented refusals to take the survey. If an individual refused to take the survey, the 
survey worker approached the next possible respondent. After completing a survey, the survey 
worker continued with the "every third person" selection process. Overall, the survey refusal rate 
was five percent. 

The survey team administered surveys across the City (in all supervisorial districts) primarily in 

outdoor locations such as streets and parks and around services sites. Surveys were completed in 

both English and Spanish; Spanish-speaking survey workers 

targeted their efforts in areas with large Spanish-speaking 

populations, such as the Mission and Downtown districts. 

Survey interviewers were instructed to screen possible 

respondents by asking them if they self-identify as homeless, 

inquiring if they had already taken the survey, and if not, if they 

were willing to do so, knowing that there was a thank you gift 

for completing the survey. Interviewers were asked to remain 

unbiased at all times, to make no prompts or assumptions, and 

to ask all questions but allow respondents to skip any question 

they did not feel comfortable answering. 

The planning team decided to focus survey efforts on outdoor, 
street locations. Overall, 27% of those surveyed were sheltered, 
while the remaining 73% were unsheltered. It should be noted 
that this street-based approach was a departure from the service- 
based approach taken in 2007. In 2007, over 40% of survey 
respondents were sheltered. 




Data Collection 



Survey interviewers emphasized the anonymity and confidentiality of the survey to encourage 
respondents to be candid in their responses. Interviewers assured respondents that these responses 
would be reported only as general findings and would not be traceable to any one individual. 

Overall, the interviewers experienced excellent cooperation from the respondents. The currently 
and formerly homeless individuals on the survey team were especially productive in 
administering surveys, with a very low refusal rate. This was potentially influenced by the 
interviewers and respondents sharing a common experience of being homeless in San Francisco. 
Another reason for interview cooperation may have been the incentive gift, which was given to 
respondents upon completion of the interview. 



Data Integrity 



In order to avoid potential duplication of respondents, the survey queried respondents' initials and 
date of birth, so that duplication could be avoided without compromising the respondents' 
anonymity. Upon completion of the survey effort, an extensive verification process was 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



IV. Methodology 



conducted to eliminate potential duplicates. This process examined respondents' date of birth, 
initials, gender, ethnicity, length of homelessness, and consistencies in patterns of responses to 
other questions in the survey. It was determined that seven of the surveys were duplicates. 
Therefore, 534 of the surveys conducted were valid. Based on a point-in-time estimate of 
approximately 6.514 homeless persons, the valid 534 surveys would represent a confidence 
interval of +/- 5% with a 95% confidence level, using a random survey process. Because this 
survey specifically targeted the street homeless population, the sample provided statistically valid 
information for the unsheltered population, but not for the sheltered population. The sheltered 
count provided supplementary information on the sheltered population. 

Survey Methodological Improvements from 2007 

The 2009 homeless survey expanded and improved upon San Francisco's first homeless survey 
effort in 2007. 

In 2007 a survey was conducted at service site locations throughout San Francisco, over a two- 
day period following the count. The 2007 survey was of more limited scope and focused on 
gathering demographic data and an estimate of the number of chronically homeless persons, 
which is a HUD reporting requirement. Surveys were completed at five local social service 
agencies. All survey responses were anonymous. Participation was voluntary, and no incentive 
gift was offered. Trained staff persons were not available to administer surveys at each survey 
location; as a result, self-administered surveys were also collected. The 2007 survey sample was 
292 homeless persons. 

This year, the planning team, in consultation with Applied Survey Research, improved the survey 
methodology by training a dedicated team of survey interviewers to administer each survey; no 
self-administered surveys were accepted for quality assurance purposes. The planning team 

expanded outreach efforts to survey homeless persons by 
enlisting the participation of currently and formerly 
homeless individuals as paid survey workers and 
offering an incentive gift to respondents for participating 
in the survey. The planning team also expanded the 
scope of the survey in order to generate additional 
information, beyond what is required by HUD, for use in 
local program development and service planning efforts. 
As mentioned above, the expanded survey sample was 
also an improvement, as it was of sufficient size to provide statistically valid information for the 
unsheltered population. By contrast, in 2007 the survey sample size was not large enough to 
provide statistically valid information on either the sheltered or unsheltered populations. 



The planning team expanded the 

scope of the survey in order to 
generate additional information, 
beyond what is required by HUD, 

for use in local program 
development and service planning. 



See Appendix C for a copy of the 2009 survey instrument. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



V. Data Results 



To accurately enumerate the point-in-time homeless population of San Francisco, the 2009 
Homeless Count included: 

1. Unsheltered homeless people, including those observed on the streets, in vehicles, and in 
makeshift structures and encampments; 

2. Sheltered homeless people occupying emergency shelters, transitional housing, and 
stabilization rooms; 

3. Persons occupying institutions such as hospitals, residential treatment centers, and jails 
(although persons in this category are not reportable to HUD). 



Number of Homeless People 



The point-in-time count was conducted on Tuesday, January 27, 2009, from 8 p.m. to midnight. 
Enumeration teams canvassed all areas of the City. Local shelters and institutions reported their 
occupancy for the night of the count. 

There were 1 ,659 persons visually identified on the streets, 1 1 1 people in 74 cars, 550 people in 
250 vans, campers, or RVs, and 389 people in 160 makeshift structures and encampments in San 
Francisco during the point-in-time count, totaling 2,709 unsheltered, or '"street," homeless 
persons. In addition, 3,805 persons were counted in 
the point-in-time shelter and institution count. The 
total combined count was 6,514 homeless persons. 



Compared to the 2007 count, the overall number of 

homeless persons enumerated increased slightly 

(2%), from 6,377 to 6,514. However, the number of 

homeless persons counted on the street decreased 

2% (from 2,771 to 2,709), while the number of 

sheltered homeless persons increased 6% (from 

3,606 to 3,805). The increase in the shelter population may be explained, in part, by the addition 

of approximately 150 rooms to the stock of stabilization rooms since 2007 and the inclusion of 

the Oshun Women's Drop In Center in the 2009 count. 



There were 2,709 unsheltered, or 

"street," homeless persons counted. In 

addition, 3,805 persons were counted in 

the shelter and institution count. 



The total combined point-in-time count 
was 6,514 homeless persons. 



Unsheltered Count 

The following tables present the results of the point-in-time unsheltered count, with detailed 
demographic information, by supervisor district. On the night of the count, the largest population 
of homeless individuals by supervisor district was in district 6, with 43% of the total (see 
Appendix F for a map of the supervisor districts). Although volunteers were not able to determine 
the race or gender of many of the individuals enumerated on the night of the count, available 
results indicated that the majority of homeless individuals were male and either white or African 
American. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Figure 2: 2009 Unsheltered Count Results by Supervisor District: Gender and Race 1 Ethnicity 




GENDER 


RACE /ETHNICITY 


Supervisor 
District 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Trans- 
gendered 


Unknown 


Asian 


Black 


Latino 


Other 


Unknown 


White 


1 


120 


40 


9 





71 





18 


1 


1 


67 


33 


2 


60 


14 


2 





44 


1 


7 


1 





45 


6 


3 


189 


100 


10 





79 





23 


6 


1 


97 


62 


4 


74 


6 








68 





3 








68 


3 


5 


115 


49 


8 


3 


55 


3 


13 


2 





56 


41 


6 


1,167 


533 


115 


1 


518 


20 


309 


22 


4 


560 


252 


7 


45 


3 


3 





39 


2 











39 


4 


8 


92 


49 


6 





37 





5 


4 





47 


36 


9 


132 


64 


7 





61 


1 


17 


26 





65 


23 


10 


444 


54 


8 





382 


1 


33 


2 





383 


25 


11 


43 


13 


1 





29 


1 


3 


2 





36 


1 


Parks & CHP 


228 


109 


36 





83 


2 


20 


5 





88 


113 


Total 


2,709 


1,034 


205 


4 


1,466 


31 


451 


71 


6 


1,551 


599 


Count % in 
2009 




38.2% 


7.6% 


0.1% 


54.1% 


1.1 % 


16.6% 


2.6% 


0.2% 


57.3% 


22.1% 



Source: San Francisco Human Services Agency, 2009 San Francisco Unsheltered Homeless Count, 2009. 

For the purposes of the count, a family was defined as a single person or couple with at least one 
child under the age of 18, following the definition set forth by HUD. Youth were defined as 
persons under 18 years. Transition aged youth were defined as 18-24 years. Of the unsheltered 
persons counted, families and youth were small percentages of the population (0.9% and 0.3%, 
respectively). The majority of unsheltered homeless persons were adults not accompanied by a 
child under age 18. It should be noted that, for safety 
and other reasons, unsheltered families and youth more 
typically stay in places not visible to enumerators and 
are thus underrepresented in street counts. 




During the course of the unsheltered count, 

enumerators counted cars, vans, campers, and RVs, and 

makeshift structures and encampments with what 

appeared to be sleeping occupants. The definition of 

makeshift structures and encampments for the purposes 

of this study was one or more makeshift structures for living, including (but not limited to) tents, 

tarps, cardboard, or crates actively being occupied by homeless persons. Out of concern for the 

privacy of the occupants and the safety of the enumerators, counters were instructed not to 

approach vehicles or encampment areas. Instead, when they could not clearly count the number of 

occupants, enumerators were asked to note on their tally sheet how many vehicles or structures / 

encampments they discovered. 

To calculate the number of people in those vehicles and structures / encampments, empirical data 
from the 2009 San Francisco Homeless Survey were used to generate a multiplier. This was done 
by asking survey respondents who reported staying in these types of living accommodations how 
many people typically stayed there, producing an average number of people for each of these 



2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



sleeping locations. The multiplier number for cars was 1 .5, for vans / campers / RVs was 2.2, and 
for makeshift structures / encampments was 2.43. These multipliers were applied to every car, 
van / camper / RV, and makeshift structure / encampment identified, resulting in the numbers 
reported here. This method of calculation was new to the 2009 count. 2 

Figure 3: 2009 Unsheltered Homeless Count Results by Supervisor District: Family Status, Age, and 
Estimated Number of Homeless Persons Living in Cars, RVs I Vans, and Structures 





FAMILY STATUS 


AGE 


VEHICLE / STRUCTURE/ 
ENCAMPMENT 


District 


Total 


Single 
Adult 


individual 
in Family 


Unknown 
Family 
Status 


Adult 


Unknown 
Age 


Trans- 
ition 
Aged 
Youth 
(18-24) 


Youth 

(under 

18) 


Individuals 
in Cars 


Individuals 

in RVs / 

Vans 


Individuals in 

Structures / 

Encampments 


1 


120 


57 





63 


26 


91 


3 





11 


27 


10 


2 


60 


22 





38 


15 


44 


1 








22 


2 


3 


189 


114 


9 


66 


108 


77 


1 


3 


2 


4 


44 


4 


74 


6 





68 


6 


68 











46 





5 


115 


68 


1 


46 


66 


45 


3 


1 


1 


11 


22 


6 


1,167 


629 


13 


525 


602 


543 


20 


2 


12 


117 


192 


7 


45 


6 





39 


5 


39 


1 





3 


22 





8 


92 


59 





33 


55 


36 


1 





3 


15 


10 


9 


132 


77 





55 


70 


57 


5 





1 


33 


17 


10 


444 


70 


2 


372 


64 


376 


3 


1 


42 


200 


80 


11 


43 


14 





29 


14 


29 








6 


9 


5 


Parks 
&CHP 


228 


147 





81 


143 


85 








30 


44 


7 


Total 


2,709 


1,269 


25 


1,415 


1,174 


1,490 


38 


7 


111 


550 


389 


%of 
Total 
2009 




46.8% 


0.9% 


52.2% 


43.3% 


55.0% 


1.4% 


0.3% 


4.1% 


20.3% 


14.4% 



Source San Francisco Human Services Agency, 2009 San Francisco Unsheltered Homeless Count, 2009- 

Of the 1.243 unsheltered homeless persons whose gender could be visually identified by 
enumerators, approximately 83% were male, 16% were female, and less than 1% were 
transgendered. Due to the limits of observation, more than half (54%) of those counted were 
identified as unknown gender - this includes those sleeping in vehicles, structures, and 
encampments. 



2 The planning team decided to use mis method to improve the accuracy of the multipliers. Prior to 2009, a multiplier of 2 was 
applied, regardless of the type of vehicle or structure / encampment. Using survey data to derive type-specific multipliers 
resulted m a multiplier less than 2 for cars and multipliers greater than 2 for vans / RVs and structures / encampments 
Accordingly, the number of persons in cars reported here is less than it would have been using the prior methodology, whereas 
the numbers of persons in vans / RVs and structures / encampments are greater than they would have been usmg the prior 
methodology. Taking all three categories together, the total number of people reported here (1,050) is 82 persons more than it 
would have been using the prior methodology (968). The planning team considers the numbers provided in the table, 
calculated with type-specific multipliers accordmg to the new methodology, to be more accurate. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Unsheltered Results Comparison: 2000-2009 

The following table compares the results of the 2009 unsheltered count and previous unsheltered 
counts. The point-in-time count of unsheltered homeless persons has remained fairly consistent 
since 2005, well below the counts tallied in 2001 and 2002. 

Figure 4: Unsheltered Count Results Comparison 2000-2009 



District 


4/27/2000 


10/25/2000 


10/25/2001 


10/29/2002 


1/25/2005 


Adjusted* 
2005 


1/31/2007 


1/27/2009 


1 


NA 


3 


69 


127 


75 


75 


218 


120 


2 


NA 


46 


92 


96 


22 


79 


81 


60 


3 


NA 


80 


280 


444 


166 


167 


206 


189 


4 


NA 


9 


161 


331 


34 


97 


70 


74 


5 


NA 


136 


233 


569 


109 


110 


114 


115 


6 


NA 


1,004 


1,158 


1,071 


1,232 


1,233 


1,239 


1,167 


7 


NA 


9 


34 


266 


10 


25 


21 


45 


8 


NA 


113 


108 


374 


158 


159 


190 


92 


9 


NA 


205 


238 


249 


191 


192 


200 


132 


10 


NA 


412 


733 


811 


483 


484 


349 


444 


11 


NA 


9 


50 


197 


17 


34 


20 


43 


Unsure 




7 














CHP 














63 




Parks & 
CHP** 
















228 


Total 


1,805 


2,033 


3,156 


4,535 


2,497 


2,655 


2,771 


2,709 



Source: San Francisco Human Services Agency, 2009 San Francisco Unsheltered Homeless Count, 2009 San Francisco Human 
Services Agency and Abbott Little Consulting, San Francisco 2007 Homeless Count, 2007. 

* 2005 counts were adjusted to reflect areas not covered by counters. 

"In 2009, park counts were combined with CHP counts, rather than added into district counts 



Sheltered Count 



A point-in-time enumeration of the number of homeless persons occupying emergency shelters, 
transitional housing, resource centers, stabilization rooms, treatment centers, hospitals, and jails 
on the night of the count was conducted in conjunction with the unsheltered count. The people 
counted in residential treatment centers, hospitals, and jails are not reportable to HUD, but they 
are included within San Francisco's local definition of homelessness. The largest group of 
sheltered homeless persons were those who stayed in emergency shelters (1,516 persons), 
comprising 40% of the total sheltered population. Transitional housing residents (964 persons) 
represented 25% of the overall sheltered homeless population. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



Figure 5: 2009 Sheltered and Unsheltered Count Results and Comparisons to 2007 and 2005 





Single 
Adults 2009 


Person in 
Families 2009 


Family Status 
Unknown 2009 


2009 
Totals 


2007 
Totals 


2005 
Totals 


Emergency Shelter 


1,206 


310 





1,516 


1,497 


1,754 


Transitional Housing 


785 


179 





964 


1,062 


1,141 


Treatment Centers 


262 


31 





293 


204 


Resource Centers 


233 








233 


182 


192* 


Stabilization Rooms 


307 








307 


139 


Jail 


394 








394 


400 


415 


Hospitals 


94 


4 





98 


122 


91" 


Sheltered Count Total 


3,281 


524 





3,805 


3,606 


3,593 


Street Total 


1,269 


25 


1,415 


2,709 


2,771 


2,655 


Unsheltered and Sheltered Total 


4,550 


549 


1,415 


6,514 


6,377 


6,248 



Source San Francisco Human Services Agency, 2009 San Francisco Unsheltered Homeless Count, 2009 San Francisco Human 
Services Agency, 2009 San Francisco Sheltered Homeless Count, 2009 San Francisco Human Services Agency and Abbott Little 
Consulting, San Francisco 2007 Homeless Count, 2007, 

* Stabilization rooms were not included in the 2005 count. 

** The 2005 count included numbers only from San Francisco General Hospital 

An estimate of 394 homeless persons was reported by the County jail for the night of January 27, 
2009. On any given day, the Sheriffs Department estimates that roughly 20% of the jail 
population is "homeless." This estimate is based on the number of prisoners whose booking cards 
indicated no local address or had a "transient" designation and the number of persons who 
provided addresses of shelters or SROs as their residence. It should be noted, however, that some 
percent of those with no local address may have an address outside of the City, and some of those 
who report their status as "transient" may simply be unwilling to provide an address. 

The 2009 sheltered count included homeless patients residing in six hospitals. The number of 
homeless persons enumerated in hospitals decreased by 20% (from 1 22 to 98) from 2007 to 2009. 
The number of homeless patients at San Francisco General Hospital declined by a third (from 48 
to 32 persons), continuing the trend of decrease observed from 2005 to 2007 (a decline of 47%). 
This decline is likely attributable to the increase of "stabilization housing" units, medical respite, 
and other alternatives to hospitalization for the chronically homeless. The previous table 
illustrates the results of the sheltered count by type of shelter facility and family status. The large 
majority of sheltered homeless persons enumerated were adults not accompanied by a child under 
age 18. 

Compared to 2007, there was a 6% increase in the sheltered homeless population (an increase of 
1 99 persons). The increase in the shelter population may be explained, in part, by the addition of 
approximately 150 rooms to the stock of stabilization rooms since 2007 and the inclusion of the 
Oshun Women's Drop In Center in the 2009 count. 

Sheltered Count Demographics 

As discussed in the sheltered count methodology section, HUD requires the collection of certain 
demographic data on the persons staying in emergency shelters and transitional housing 
programs. The demographic data collected from the 20 emergency shelters and 21 transitional 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



housing programs reporting census numbers on January 27, 2009 are presented in the following 
table. Clients were identified in one or more categories, as applicable. 

Figure 6: Demographic Data: Emergency Shelter and Transitional Housing Residents, January 27, 2009 



Facility Type 


Chronically 
Homeless 


Serious 
Mental Illness 


Substance 
Abuse 


Veteran 


Domestic 
Violence 


Unaccompanied 
Youth 


Emergency Shelter 


56.5% 


35.4% 


43.7% 


9.1% 


14.6% 


0.1% 


Transitional Housing 


15.6%* 


9.6% 


17.3% 


6.6% 


10.6% 


0.0% 



Source: San Francisco Human Services Agency, 2009 San Francisco Sheltered Homeless Count, 2009. 

*Note: These data are gathered for the purpose of local service planning, but are not reportable to HUD, as HUD does not 
consider individuals in transitional housing to still be chronically homeless. 

Demographic data were not collected on persons counted at the resource centers, stabilization 
rooms, treatment centers, hospitals, or jail. 



Survey Results 



The following section provides an overview of the results of the 2009 San Francisco Homeless 

Survey. The survey findings were used to define 

qualitative characteristics of the overall population. The 

survey team successfully completed 534 surveys with 

unduplicated (unique) homeless individuals throughout 

San Francisco over a three-week period from early to late 

February. Approximately 8% of these surveys were 

conducted in Spanish. Missing values have been intentionally omitted from the 2009 survey 

results. Therefore, the total number of respondents for each question will not necessarily equal the 

total number of surveys. Please note, however, that missing values were included in tables 

comparing 2007 and 2009 data, for comparative purposes. A copy of the survey instrument can 

be found in Appendix C. 



The survey findings were used to 

define qualitative characteristics of 

the overall homeless population. 



As mentioned in the methodology section of this report, the survey expanded upon the survey 
effort undertaken in 2007. The size of the sample increased to 534 from 292 (an 83% increase). 

As also noted in the methodology section, there was a shift from a service-based survey 
administration method in 2007 to a street-based method in 2009. Fewer sheltered homeless 

persons were included in the 2009 survey sample. 
They comprised 27% of the total sample in 2009, 
compared to over 40% of the 2007 sample. It is 
important to consider this change in the proportions of 
sheltered and unsheltered respondents when 
comparing survey results from 2007 and 2009. 

The survey elicited information such as 
demographics, family status, causes of homelessness, 
length and recurrence of homelessness, usual 
nighttime accommodations, and access to homeless services through closed-ended and multiple 
response questions. A complete list of survey questions and responses is included in Appendix D. 




© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



Demographics 



In order to measure the diversity of homeless residents in San Francisco, respondents were asked 
to answer several questions pertaining to their age, gender, ethnicity, and military service. 

Age 

Approximately 36% of survey respondents were between 41 and 50 years of age. 

The second and third largest age segments among respondents were 51 to 60 (24%) and 31 
to 40 (21%). 

/ Seniors (more than 60 years old) comprised 4% of survey respondents. 

Race / Ethnicity 

The two largest racial / ethnic groups among survey respondents were White / Caucasian 
(37%) and Black / African American (35%). 

* 15% of survey respondents identified as Hispanic / Latino. 

Figure 7: Race I Ethnicity of Survey Respondents and General Population of San Francisco 
g 100% 

o 

1 80% 

8 

| 60 

o 

^ 40% 

an 

2 20% 



Survey Respondents General SF Population* 

□ Black / African American [jjWhite / Caucasian HHispanic / Latino 

San Francisco Homeless Count Survey Respondents N = 531 

General San Francisco Population N = 757.604 

Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009 Bay Area Census (2009) San Francisco 
City and County Retrieved March 20, 2009, from Bay Area Census website URL www bayareacensus ca gov/counties/ 
SanFranciscoCounty.htm 

"These are 2007 American Community Survey estimates 

Gender 

* Among survey respondents, the large majority was male (78%). 

* 21% of survey respondents were female. 

* Transgendered people constituted 1% of survey respondents. 




2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Veteran Status 

17% of survey respondents had served in the United States 
Armed Forces. 

Two-thirds of the veterans surveyed (67%) received an 
honorable discharge from service. 



17% of survey respondents 

had served in the United 

States Armed Forces. 



Family Status 

* Three-quarters (75%) of survey respondents indicated they were living alone at the time of 
the survey. 

Of those who lived with others, 36% lived with friends, 34% lived with a spouse or partner, 
and 6% lived with child/children. 

"* Of the 15 of respondents who were 21 years old or younger, 7 had previously been in foster 
care. 

Education 



40% of survey respondents indicated that they had 
completed high school or received a GED, as their highest 



level of education. 

12% of unemployed respondents said that they needed 
training, and 9% said they needed education, in order to 
secure a job. 



40% of survey respondents 

indicated that they had 

completed high school or 

received a GED, as their highest 

level of education. 



* All six survey respondents with school-aged children (6 - 17 years old) living with them 
reported that the children were enrolled in school. 

Criminal Justice 

v Approximately 26% of survey respondents reported they had spent one or more nights in 
jail or prison in the last 12 months. 

12% of those responding to the survey indicated that they had been on probation or parole 
when they became homeless. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



San Francisco Residency 

"* The large majority of survey respondents (78%) reported that they were living in San 
Francisco right before they became homeless. 

• 73% of these respondents had lived in San Francisco for one year or more; 43% were 
San Francisco residents for more than 10 years. 

6% of those surveyed had been living in neighboring Bay Area counties (Alameda, Contra 
Costa, San Mateo, Marin, and Santa Clara Counties) right before they became homeless. 

* Of those who came to San Francisco after becoming homeless, the most frequent response 
(24%) for the primary reason for coming to San Francisco was that the individual came "for a 
job / seeking work." 

The percentage of persons surveyed who reported that they became homeless outside of 
San Francisco decreased from 31% in 2007 to 22% in 2009. 

Figure 8: Residence When Respondent Became Homeless 



Where were you living at the time you 


most recently became homeless? 






2007 
Number 


Percent 


2009 
Number 


Percent 


San Francisco 


182 : 


62.3% 


418 I 


78.3% 


Outside of CA 


46 


15.8% 


46 | 


8.6% 


Other County in CA 


44 


15.1% 


70 


13.1% 


No response 


20 


6.8% 


o 


0.0% 


Total 


292 


100.0% 


534 


100.0% 



Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009 San Francisco Human Services Agency 
and Abbott Little Consulting, San Francisco 2007 Homeless Count, 2007 



Characteristics of Homelessness 

Characteristics of homelessness vary greatly among respondents. While many respondents were 
experiencing homelessness for the first time, or had been homeless just a few months, others had 
been homeless repeatedly or for extended periods of time. Characteristics such as usual nighttime 
sleeping accommodations and causes of homelessness differed across respondents. 

Homeless Status 
^ 45% of survey respondents were experiencing homelessness for the first time. 



2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Length of Homelessness 

73% of respondents had been homeless for 12 months or longer since they last lived in a 
permanent housing situation. 

• 46% of respondents reported that they had been homeless for more than 3 years. 
10% of those surveyed had been homeless for 3 months or less. 

Figure 9: Length of Homelessness 



How Long Have You Been Homeless? 




20 
Number 


07 

Percent 




2009 
Number 


Percent 


Less than 1 year 


74 


25.3% 




143 


26.8% 


1 - 3 years 


90 


30.8% 




147 


27.5% 


More than 3 years 


102 ; 34.9% 




243 


45.5% 


Declined to answer 


11 | 3.8% 


1 ! 0.2% 


Don't know 


15 ! 5.1% 




i 



0.0% 


Total 


292 99.9% 




534 


100.0% 



Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009. San Francisco Human Services Agency 
and Abbott Little Consulting, San Francisco 2007 Homeless Count, 2007, 

Note: Totals may not equal 100% due to rounding. 



Transition Aged Youth (18-24 Years) 



/ 



/ 



Of survey respondents ages 18 to 24, 60% reported being 
homeless for a year or more. In 2007, 75% of respondents in 
this age group had reported being homeless for one year or 
more. 



Of survey respondents ages 

18 to 24, 60% reported 

being homeless for a year 

or more. 



Of survey respondents ages 18 to 24, about 28% reported 

being homeless for three years or more. In 2007, 36% of 

respondents in this age group had reported that they had been homeless for three years or 

more. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



Recurrence of Homelessness 

* When asked how many times they had been homeless in the past 12 months, two-thirds of 
respondents (67%) indicated that they had been homeless only once (their current period of 
homelessness). 



/ 



17% of respondents had been homeless two or three times in the past twelve months. 



7 14% of respondents had experienced six or more episodes of homelessness within the past 
year. 

Figure 10: In the Last 12 Months, How Many Times Have You Been Homeless, Including this Present 
Time? 



5 100% 



01 


60% 


01 




h 

o 


40% 


X 




o 


20% 



66.5% 



n 



10.9% 



13.0% 



1.0% 



1 .7% 



One time 2 times 3 times 4 times 5 times 6 times More than 

6 times 



N = 523 

Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey. 2009 

Figure 11: In the Last 3 Years, How Many Times Have You Been Homeless, Including this Present Time? 



o 


100% 




iC 






0j 
Q. 


80% ■ 

E 


7.0°/ 


01 


60% 




01 




b 

o 


40% 




X 






o 


20% 




(LI 


0% 





12.0% 8 8% 

2.9% 

■1 *~* 



15.9% 

n 



One time 2 times 3 times 4 times 5 times 6 times More than 

6 times 



N= 523 

Source Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



The Chronically Homeless 

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) defines chronic homelessness as: 

An unaccompanied individual with a disabling condition who has been: 

a. Continually homeless for one year or more; or 

b. Has experienced four or more episodes of homelessness within the past 3 years. 

Those currently living in transitional housing are not considered by HUD to be chronically 
homeless. 

For the purposes of this study, a "disabling condition" was defined as a physical or mental 
disability (such as mental illness), alcohol or drug addiction, HIV / AIDS, chronic health 
conditions, or a developmental disability. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and depression, which 
are not always factored into the determination of chronic homelessness, were also included as 
disabling conditions in this study. 

Please note that the chronically homeless numbers discussed below were generated with survey 
data on self-reported disabling conditions, rather than verified clinical diagnoses or case 
management file designations. The increase in the percentage of chronically homeless survey 
respondents may be due, in part, to the change to a street-based surveying approach in 2009. 

Of the 534 homeless persons surveyed, approximately 62% (332 persons) can be considered 
chronically homeless using the above criteria. 

• 77% of the chronically homeless are unsheltered. 
Figure 12: Chronically Homeless Survey Respondents 



2007 
Number 



Percent 



105 (of 292) 



36.0% 



2009 
Number 



Percent 



332 (of 534) 



62.2% 



Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009- San Francisco Human Services Agency 
and Abbott Little Consulting, San Francisco 2007 Homeless Count, 2007. 



13: Where Do You Usually Stay at Night? (Top 5 Responses from Chronically Homeless Persons) 




3.6% 



Outdoors / 
streets / parks 



Motel / Hotel 



Public facilies A place in a 
(e.g., transit house not 

center) normally used 

for sleeping 



N = 332 

Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



Figure 14: Services I Assistance Used by Chronically Homeless Persons (Top 5 Responses) 

100%= 81.8% 



60% 
40% 
20% 
0% 



48.6% 



47.4% 



42.2% 



n n n ri 



Free meals Shelter day Project 

services / drop Homeless 

in center Connect 



Emergency Health services 
shelter 



Multiple response question with 329 respondents offenng 1,055 responses 

Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009. 



Usual Nighttime Accommodation 

As in 2007. the survey results indicated that the majority of respondents were staying in an 
outdoor location or in a local emergency shelter. The survey asked about a variety of living 
situations that were not included in the unsheltered or sheltered counts: abandoned buildings, 

motels / hotels, and locations on private property such as 
unconverted garages and storage buildings. Individuals 
staying in motels / hotels and within residences in which 
the person does not permanently live (often referred to 
as "doubled-up" or "couch surfing*') are not included in 
HUD's definition of homelessness, but are included in 
San Francisco's local definition of homelessness. 



* Half of survey respondents (50%) reported that they usually stay outdoors / on the streets / 
in parks at night. 



Survey results indicated that the 

majority of respondents were 

staying in an outdoor location or in 

a local emergency shelter. 



s 



24% of survey respondents usually stay in an emergency shelter at night. 



* 5% of survey respondents usually stay at public facilities 
such as transit stations at night. 

* 5% of those surveyed reported a vehicle (car, van, or 
camper/ RV) as their usual nighttime accommodation. 




© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Figure 15: Where Do You Usually Stay at Night? 



Outdoors / streets / parks 



Emergency shelter 



Public facilities (e.g., transit center) 5.1% 



Motel /hotel 4.2% 



A place in a house not normally used for sleeping 3.8% 



Other shelter 2.5% 



Automobile- 2.3% 



I] 

P. 

1 

] 



Encampment 1.3% 



Van 1 . 3% 



Backyard or storage structure 0.9% 



Camper 0.9% 



23.9% 



50. 3% 



Unconverted garage / attic / basement 0.6% 



Transitional housing 0.6% 



Abandoned building 0.4% 



Other 1 . 9% 



0% 15% 30% 45% 60% 



N = 527 

Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



Figure 16: Nighttime Accommodation - Comparison of Selected Data from 2007 and 2009 





2007 


2009 


Emergency shelter 


40.0% 


23.6% 


Outdoors / street / park 


26.7% 


49.6% 


Motel / hotel 


5.5% 


4.1% 


Automobile / van / camper 


4.5% 


4.5% 


Transitional housing 


2.4% 


0.6% 


Abandoned building 


1.4% 


0.4% 



Before becoming homeless, 

45% of survey respondents 

were "renting a home or 

apartment." 



Source Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009. San Francisco Human Services Agency 
and Abbott Little Consulting, San Francisco 2007 Homeless Count, 2007. 

Note Percentages shown here refer to the total survey sample, including those who did not respond to the question (2007 N = 
292; 2009 N = 534). 

Please note that the increase in the percentage of unsheltered homeless survey respondents shown 
in the table above may be due, in part, to the change to a street-based surveying approach in 2009 
from a service site-based approach in 2007. 

Prior Living Situation 

* Before becoming homeless, 45% of survey respondents were 
"renting a home or apartment." 

"* 31% of survey respondents were "living with parents / 
relatives" or "staying with friends." 

^ 10% responding to the survey had been "living in a home 
owned by you or your partner." 

Reasons for Homelessness 

In addition to understanding the characteristics of the homeless population, it is important to 
understand the causes of homelessness. This is an important distinction because of the 
interrelationships of many of these issues. Homeless survey respondents self-reported a number 
of reasons for their condition. It should be noted that these are self-defined reasons, which do not 
necessarily reflect the order of the events leading to their homelessness. 

Primary Causes of Homelessness 

v The loss of a job was the most frequently cited response (25%) for the causation of 
homelessness. Unemployment was similarly the most common response in 2007. 

"* 15% of survey respondents identified alcohol or drug use as the primary cause of their 
homelessness. 

"* 5% of survey respondents cited incarceration as the primary event that led to their 
homelessness. 

* 3% reported that mental health issues had precipitated their homelessness. 

* 3% of survey respondents indicated that they became homeless due to family / domestic 
violence. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Figure 17: Primary Event I Condition that Led to Homelessness 
1 — — — ■ 

Lost job 



Alcohol or drug use 

Argument / family or friend 
asked you to leave 



Divorced or separated 



Mental health illness 



Family / domestic violence 



Don't know /dedineto 
state 



Landlord sold / stopped 



5. 3% 




9% 



renting or re-used property 
Illness or medical problem I 1.7% 



Landlord raised rent 1.5% 



U 

Lost my home to I"""] - ,„, 

foreclosure — I 

Death in the family I 1 . 1 % 

Hospitalization/ treatment ""| » _„. 

program «J 

Got too old for foster care 0.6% 



Hurricane Katrina | 0.6% 
Other natural disaster / fire 



/flood 






Asked to leave for being _ _„, 
LGBT* 



25.2% 



0% 



10% 



16.0% 



20% 



30% 



N = 532 

Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009. 

* Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



Obstacles to Securing Permanent Housing 



/ 



The majority of survey respondents (52%) reported that their inability to afford rent was an 
obstacle to securing permanent housing. 



The second most frequently cited barrier to permanent housing was the lack of job / income 
(44%). 

"* 6% of respondents indicated that they do not want to get permanent housing. 

Figure 18: What is Keeping You from Getting Permanent Housing? (Top 5 Responses*) 



60% 



45% 



30% 



15% 



0% 



51.8% 




14.9% 



13.9% 



Can't afford rent 



No money for No housing 

moving costs available 

(security, first / 
last) 



Multiple response question with 531 respondents offering 826 responses 

Source Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009. 

"Note These are the top five responses of choices given 12 1% responded "other." 



Don't want to 



Employment Status 

* The large majority of survey respondents indicated that they were unemployed at the time 
of the survey (92%). 

* 6% of those surveyed reported that they were employed part-time. 

* 2% of respondents indicated that they had full-time employment. 

Barriers to Employment 

^ More than a quarter of respondents (27%) indicated that 
their lack of a permanent address was keeping them from 
getting employment. 



* The second and third most frequently cited barriers were a 
need for clothing (16%) and the lack of a phone (15%). 

* 14% of survey respondents reported that a physical 
disability was keeping them from securing employment. 



More than a quarter of 
respondents indicated that 
their lack of a permanent 
address was keeping them 
from getting employment. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Figure 19: What is Keeping You from Getting Employment? (Top 5 Responses) 



30% 



20% 



26.6% 



i 



15.6% 




° 14 - 3% 13.5% 

n n n 



No permanent Need clothing No phone Physical disability No shower 

address facilities 



Multiple response question with 488 respondents offering 1,038 responses. 

Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009. 



Accessing Services 

Receiving government assistance and accessing homeless services 
may enable homeless individuals to transition out of homelessness. 
However, many people do not apply for these programs and 
services or do not feel they qualify for aid. 

Government Assistance 

» 38% of survey respondents reported that they receive Food 
Stamps. 

21% of those surveyed received County Adult Assistance 
Program / GA. 

"* 21% of respondents indicated that they receive SSI 
(Supplemental Security Income) / SSDI. 




•/ aai 



34% of respondents were not currently receiving government assistance at the time of the 
survey. 



Reasons for Not Receiving Government Assistance 

The most frequent reason reported for not receiving government assistance was that the 

individual had never applied (18%). 



y 



17% of survey respondents indicated that they did not think they were eligible to receive 
assistance. 



17% of those surveyed responded that they did not need government assistance. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



Figure 20: Reasons for Not Receiving Government Assistance (Top 5 Responses) 

25% 

18.4% 



20% 
15% 
10% 

5% 
0% 



16.8% 



16.8% 



14.0% 



12.8% 



Never applied Don't think I'm Don't need Have no Will apply soon 

eligble government identification 

assistance 

Multiple response question with 179 respondents offering 237 responses 

Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey. 2009. 



Homeless Services and Programs 

* The type of service most commonly accessed by survey respondents was free meals (78% of 
respondents). 

Over 40% of respondents indicated that they access each of the following services: 
emergency shelter (45%), shelter day services / drop-in center (43%), and Project Homeless 
Connect (42%). 

27% of respondents reported that they access health services. 



• 



/ 



Figure 21: Services /Assistance Currently Being Used by Respondents (Top 5 Responses) 

100% 



)% 



77.8% 



60% 



40% 



20% 



0% 



45 - 2% 43.3% 42.3% 

I I I i 

Free meals Emergency Shelter day Project Health services 

shelter services / drop Homeless 

in center Connect 



Multiple response question with 527 respondents offering 1615 responses. 

Source Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Sources of Income 



While some respondents were able to earn income from employment, many respondents were 
receiving income from public assistance, panhandling, or other sources. 



Income from Government Sources 

47% of survey respondents reported that they do not receive 
income from government programs. 



Over a quarter of respondents (26%) reported receiving 
between $1 and $500 per month from government programs. 

v 13% of those surveyed received $1 to $100 per month from 
government programs. 



47% of survey 

respondents reported 

that they do not receive 

income from government 

programs. 



Income from Private Sources 

v Over 70% of those surveyed reported that they receive $0 (40%) or $1-100 (33%) monthly 
from non-government sources. 

"* 44% of respondents identified recycling as a source of income. 

* A third of survey respondents (33%) received funds from family / friends. 

Panhandling 

* Two-thirds of survey respondents (67%) reported that they do not panhandle (ask people 
for money or spare change). 

* Of those who panhandle, 31% reported that they panhandle 1 to 5 days a month. 

* 46% of those who panhandle reported that they receive $50 or less in a typical month. 

Figure 22: Do You Panhandle, or Ask People for Money or Spare Change? 




N = 522 

Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey, 2009. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



Alcohol and Drug Abuse 

Substance use (alcohol or drugs) was the second-most cited cause of homelessness among the 
homeless survey population in San Francisco. Furthermore, many survey respondents reported 
that they were currently abusing alcohol or drugs. 

Alcohol Abuse 

/ 32% of survey respondents indicated that they were currently 
experiencing alcohol abuse. 

Drug Abuse 

31% of those surveyed said they were currently experiencing drug 
abuse. 

Recovery 

"* Of those currently experiencing substance abuse, 14% reported that they are currently 
receiving alcohol / drug counseling. 




Domestic Violence 

* 9% of survey respondents indicated that they were currently experiencing domestic 
violence. 

"* Of the females surveyed, 18% reported that they were currently experiencing domestic 
abuse. 



Health Status and Medical Care 

Access to health care, so vital to general well being, is an area of particular concern among 
homeless service providers. While many people struggle with the high costs of health care, 
homeless people are particularly vulnerable to the 
challenges of accessing adequate care. 



Access to Medical Care 



23% of survey respondents have 

needed medical care and been 

unable to receive it. 



~* In their current period of homelessness, 23% of survey 

respondents have needed medical care and been unable to receive it. 

* The top three responses about where respondents usually receive medical care were: 

hospital emergency room (28%), public health clinic (27%), and free clinic / community clinic 
(26%). 

"* 5% of survey respondents said that they had visited a hospital emergency room more than 5 
times in the last 12 months to receive treatment. 

» 41% of those surveyed reported that they had not visited a hospital emergency room for 
any treatment in the past 12 months. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 




Mental Illness 

^ 30% of survey respondents reported that they were 
currently experiencing mental illness. 

1 The majority of respondents (55%) said that they were 
currently experiencing depression. 

s 73% of those who reported experiencing mental illness and 
/ or depression were unsheltered. 

^ 85% of survey respondents currently experiencing mental illness and/or depression were 
not receiving mental health services. 

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder 

* 29% of survey respondents reported that they were experiencing Post-traumatic Stress 
Disorder (PTSD). 

'* 44% of veterans surveyed said they are currently experiencing PTSD. 

Physical Disability 

* Approximately 37% of survey respondents said that they were currently experiencing a 
physical disability. 



pondents said that they were currently experiencing HIV / AIDS or 



HIV and AIDS 

* About 4% of survey res 
related illnesses. 

Chronic Health Problems 

"* One in three respondents (34%) reported that they were currently experiencing chronic 
health problems. 



Developmental Disability 

respondents saia mat iney were currently 
i developmental disability (a chronic condition 

tlu limits a nprtnn's ahilitu tci cnpak hpar cpp 



'■ 12% of survey respondents said that they were currently 
experiencing a developmental disability (a chronic condition 
that significantly limits a person's ability to speak, hear, see, 
walk, learn, or perform fundamental tasks). 



according to survey responses, tne service most utilized Dy 
those reporting a developmental disability was free meals (71%). 



12% of survey respondents 

said that they were 

currently experiencing a 

developmental disability. 



v According to survey responses, the service most utilized by 

»' free meals I 

developmental disability said that they did 



About 7% of those who reported experiencing a 
not use any homeless services 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



V. Data Results 



Nutrition 
About 3 in 5 (62%) survey respondents said that they got enough to eat on a daily basis. 

Figure 23: Do You Usually Get Enough to Eat on a Daily Basis? 

75% 



61.5% 



50% 



25% 



n 

19.5% 

I I I"! 



Yes 



Sometimes 



N = 524 

Source: Applied Survey Research, 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey. 2009 



19.1% 



Survey Implications 

In comparing the population included in the survey sample with the populations enumerated in 
the unsheltered and sheltered counts, the demographic composition of the populations differ. 
Survey results suggest that there may be a larger percentage of Hispanic / Latino homeless 
persons in the local homeless population. Hispanics / Latinos comprised 15% of the survey 
sample, but only 3% of the unsheltered count population. This implication is in agreement with 
the survey findings in 2007. A possible explanation is that homeless Hispanics / Latinos as a 
group are less likely to stay in outdoor nighttime locations visible to enumerator teams (e.g., 
streets and other public places). 



Continued use of such a surveying 

approach will enable the tracking 

of trends in key indicators about 

the unsheltered population. 



As discussed in the methodology section of this report, the 

shift to a street-focused surveying approach resulted in a 

higher percentage of unsheltered survey respondents 

compared to 2007 and generated considerable data on the 

unsheltered homeless population of San Francisco. These 

data can provide a baseline of information about the 

unsheltered homeless population. Continued use of such a 

surveying approach will enable the tracking of trends in key indicators about the unsheltered 

population, such as chronically homeless status, disability and health status, and service use. This 

information may prove very useful in providing outreach and services to unsheltered homeless 

persons, who are often less integrated into support service networks than their sheltered 

counterparts. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



V. Data Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



VI. Limitations 



VI. Limitations 



There are limitations and constraints to every study. The following shortcomings of the San 
Francisco Homeless Count and Survey could be addressed in the future, with the investment of 
additional resources. 



Unsheltered Count Limitations 



The biennial point-in-time counts are organized around HUD's definition of homelessness, which 
is limited to people who are living on the streets, staying in places not intended for human 
habitation, or residing in emergency shelters or transitional housing facilities. San Francisco has 

adopted a broader local definition of homelessness that 
also includes people who are moving from one 
acquaintance's house to another, families staying in units 
that are inadequate in terms of occupancy standards, and 
others who are transient but temporarily residing indoors 
in private residences on the night of the count. 



San Francisco has adopted a 
broader local definition of 
homelessness than HUD's. 



In its efforts to serve the local homeless population, San Francisco targets both outreach and 
services to those encompassed by the broader definition of homelessness, particularly families, 
children, and youth, who are in need yet remain ineligible for HUD homeless assistance. 
However, due to the significant additional financial and human resources that would be required, 
San Francisco has not adopted a strategy of trying to enumerate all of the people included in the 
local definition of homelessness because this effort would potentially divert much-needed 
resources from direct homeless assistance. Thus, the point-in-time count was limited to those who 
were found in street locations or in designated facilities on January 27, 2009, in accordance with 
the guidelines set forth by HUD. Point-in-time counts are "snapshots" that quantify the size of the 
homeless population at a given point during the year. 
Hence, the count may not be representative of 
fluctuations and compositional changes in the homeless 
population seasonally or over time. 




There are many challenges in any point-in-time 

homeless enumeration, especially when implemented in 

a community as diverse as San Francisco. While 

homeless populations are typically concentrated around 

downtown emergency shelters and homeless services 

facilities, homeless individuals and families can also be found in locations in residential 

neighborhoods, commercial districts, and outlying areas that are not easily accessible by 

enumerators. Homeless populations include several difficult-to-enumerate subsets such as: 

• Chronically homeless persons who never or seldom access social and health services; 

• Persons living in vehicles who relocate frequently; 

• Persons who have minor children and stay "under the radar" because of the difficulty 
of maintaining an intact family on the street; 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



• Homeless youth who usually tend to keep themselves less visible than homeless 
adults for safety and other reasons; 

• Immigrant groups and other subpopulations who live in overcrowded shared 
residences or rental units above safe occupancy levels; and 

• Homeless people who sleep in abandoned buildings and other structures unfit for 
habitation. 

Unsheltered Undercount 

In this non-intrusive, point-in-time, visual homeless enumeration, it should be noted that the 
methods employed, while HUD approved, have some inherent biases and shortcomings. Even 
with the assistance of experienced homeless service providers and outreach workers, the 
methodology cannot guarantee 100% accuracy. Many factors may have contributed to an 
unsheltered undercount, for example: 

• The employed homeless may have been at work or in transit during the count and 
may not have been identified as being homeless; 

• Homeless individuals often occupy abandoned buildings and other structures unfit for 
human habitation, which are unsafe for enumerator teams to enter and inspect; 

• Homeless youth often "couch surf from one location to another, making their 
identification difficult; 

• Homeless families, and some immigrant populations, are more likely to seek 
opportunities to "double-up" and "triple-up" in housing with family and friends, 
rather than sleep on the street, in vehicles, or makeshift shelters, thus making their 
identification difficult; and 

• It can be difficult to identify homeless persons who may be sleeping in cars, vans, or 
campers / recreational vehicles. 

Based on the reasons listed above, the homeless census methodology most likely resulted in an 
undercount of homeless immigrants, some of the working 
homeless, homeless families, and street youth. 



The homeless census methodology 

most likely resulted in an 

undercount of homeless 

immigrants, some of the working 

homeless, homeless families, and 

street youth. 



Some community members have expressed particular 
concern regarding the undercount of homeless families. 
The San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) 
employs a broader definition of homelessness in its record- 
keeping. 3 SFUSD estimates that there were 1 ,623 
homeless school-aged youth enrolled in the district, from 
pre-K to 12th grade, in January 2009. In addition to the number provided by the school district, 
San Francisco also gathers data on homeless families from the Connecting Point family waitlist. 
Connecting Point is a centralized intake program for families who are seeking emergency shelter 
in San Francisco. The waitlist, which is updated on a weekly basis, captures the number of 
families who have come to Connecting Point seeking shelter. On January 27, 2009, there were 
1 76 families on this waitlist. The locations where these families stay while waiting for shelter 



SFUSD includes children and youth living in shelters, single room occupancy (SRO), transitional housing, the streets, cars, 
abandoned buildings, and doubled-up and other inadequate accommodations in their estimate. 

© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



VI. Limitations 



varies, including vehicles, hotels, the homes of family or friends, and time-limited transitional 
recovery or domestic violence programs. 

Despite the instructions provided to volunteers, the visual assessment of who is homeless during 

the unsheltered "public places" count involves subjectivity. Volunteers may not count those 

homeless individuals who do not manifest any of the 

characteristics or behaviors described in the volunteer 

instructions. Conversely, persons involved in behaviors 

stereotypically associated with the homeless, such as 

panhandling, may be mistakenly counted as homeless 

even if they are housed. In addition, counts of 

individuals in vehicles and makeshift structures are 

estimates because volunteers were instructed not to 

approach or enter these types of nighttime 

accommodations out of concern for the privacy of the 

homeless population and the safety of volunteers. 

HSA has considered other unsheltered count methodologies, in the interest of decreasing the 
subjectivity involved in the count and attaining a more accurate number. One approach that has 
been considered is conducting interviews of all persons observed during the street count to 
determine whether they self-identify as homeless. Covering the entire city using this approach 
would require significantly more volunteers or a multiple-night count. A multiple-night count is a 
more expensive approach and would require additional resources. Moreover, a multiple-night 

count would require a methodology to eliminate duplicate 
counting of individuals. In addition, interviewing raises 
concerns about disturbing the privacy of homeless persons 
and compromising the safety of volunteer enumerators. 




Although the unsheltered count 
was most likely an undercount of 

the homeless population, the 

methodology employed, coupled 

with the homeless survey data, 

was the most comprehensive 

approach available. 



The methodological approach used was necessary in order 
to prevent duplicate counting and preserve the integrity of 
the data collected. Although the unsheltered count was 
most likely an undercount of the homeless population, the 
methodology employed, coupled with the homeless survey 
data, was the most comprehensive approach available, given resource constraints. A possible 
improvement to be considered for future unsheltered counts is outreach to and inclusion of 
currently homeless persons of various subpopulations, who could offer strategic assistance in 
enumerating difficult-to-count populations such as families, youth, and those residing in vehicles. 



Sheltered Count Limitations 



Program staff, rather than homeless persons, provided the data collected in the sheltered count. 
There may be some variance in the data that the homeless individuals would have self-reported. 
In the case of the County jail, the number of homeless individuals occupying the jail on the night 
of the count was an estimate, not an exact count. The sheltered count, like the unsheltered count, 
is a point-in-time snapshot of the homeless population, which may not be representative of 
variations in composition and size seasonally and over the course of the year. 

The enumeration of homeless persons in hospital facilities is a challenge in many communities. A 
possible improvement to be considered for future sheltered counts is more comprehensive 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



VI. Limitations 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



enumeration of homeless persons staying in hospitals on the night of the count. This would 
require additional outreach to involve these facilities as partners in the homeless enumeration 
effort. 



Survey Limitations 

This year, many improvements were made to the survey component of the project including the 
translation of the survey instrument into Spanish and targeted outreach to Spanish-speaking 
populations by bilingual survey workers and volunteers. However, the homeless survey does not 
include an equal representation of all homeless experiences. The administration of the surveys in 
street locations tends to over-represent the street and emergency sheltered homeless, resulting in 
under-representation of transitional housing residents and a potentially large population of 
homeless individuals and families living in unfit or overcrowded housing. 



Peer interviewing strategy is 
believed to allow respondents to be 
more forthcoming in their answers. 



In survey research, there is always an opportunity for 
misrepresentation or bias. This is noted and 
acknowledged by HUD in their homeless street count 
guidelines. 4 In the administration of the survey, 
definitions were not given to respondents by the 
interviewer. Therefore, all results are based on self- 
definitions. It is important to make every effort to elicit the most truthful responses from 
interviewees. The recruitment and training of paid currently and formerly homeless survey 
workers was an effort to encourage candor on the part of respondents, as a peer interviewing 
strategy is believed to allow respondents to be more forthcoming in their answers and to reduce 
the apprehension of revealing personal information. 

Despite these limitations, the survey results provide considerable information about homelessness 
in San Francisco, of potential use in outreach and service planning, particularly for the 
unsheltered homeless, as discussed in the methodology section of this report. 

Although surveys were administrated across the City, in all supervisorial districts, some 
neighborhoods were underrepresented in the survey sample, particularly in the Bayview district. 
A possible improvement to be considered for future survey efforts is a more precise approach to 
targeting the administration of surveys on the street, to ensure the equal representation of 
homeless persons in all areas of the City, and a strategy for reaching a greater number of 
transitional housing residents through their housing program or other venues. 



U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Community Planning and Development. A Guide to 
Counting Unsheltered Homeless People, Second Revision. January 2008. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



VII. Conclusion 



VII. Conclusion 

The biennial point-in-time count offers an opportunity to assess changes in the size and 
composition of San Francisco's homeless population over time. For HSA and other local 
homeless service providers, it also provides data to track the impact of programs on the overall 
condition of the homeless population. 

Though the 2009 point-in-time count registered a slight increase in the homeless population of 
San Francisco, this should not detract from the tremendous progress that the City has made in 
addressing the issue of homelessness through a number of successful programs, which have 

positively impacted the lives of thousands of people over 
the past two years. Indeed, even within the context of the 
slight increase in the overall homeless population, there 
was a slight shift in the balance of unsheltered and 
sheltered persons, with the sheltered population increasing 
and the street population decreasing. 



The slight increase in the 

homeless population of San 

Francisco should not detract from 

the tremendous progress that the 

City has made in addressing the 

issue of homelessness through a 

number of successful programs 

over the past two years. 



It is difficult to assess changes in the composition and 
condition of the local homeless population between 2007 
and 2009, due to the change in the survey methodology 
and instrument. However, this year's survey provides a 
baseline of information on the local homeless population 
across numerous indicators. The continued use of this survey instrument will generate 
longitudinal data that will illustrate changes in the homeless population and condition over time 
of great use in outreach efforts and service planning. 

Within a major metropolitan area such as San Francisco, many factors contribute to the size of the 

local homeless population. The survey found that job prospects and the presence of a support 

network of family and friends draw sizable numbers of already homeless persons to San 

Francisco. The availability of homeless services in San 

Francisco may also attract additional homeless persons 

and persons on the verge of becoming homeless. As 

noted in the Executive Summary, 38% of homeless 

survey respondents reported that they first became 

homeless outside of San Francisco or were relative 

newcomers, having lived in the City for three months 

or less. 

The relatively stable size of the local homeless 
population obscures the fact that many individual lives have been changed for the better through 
San Francisco's homeless initiatives. It is important to consider the results of the 2009 count 
within the context of local efforts to move individuals and families out of homelessness, through 
the provision of housing and support services. Since 2004, San Francisco has continued several 
ambitious initiatives to reduce the size of the homeless population, including the Five Year 
Strategic Plan Toward Ending Homelessness and the Ten Year Plan to End Chronic 
Homelessness. Approximately 9,143 homeless single adults have left the streets or shelter system 
for permanent housing since January 2004, with the assistance of the programs outlined below, 
either by securing permanent housing in the City or by returning home to a city outside of San 
Francisco. The following is a summary of these initiatives and their impacts to date. 




© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



VII. Conclusion 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Care Not Cash: Care Not Cash is a program that offers homeless recipients of County 
general assistance housing / shelter and support services as a portion of their benefit 
package. Homeless persons receiving cash assistance from the City's County Adult 
Assistance Program (CAAP) were phased into Care Not Cash over a seven-month 
period (from May through November 2004). CAAP is San Francisco's cash aid 
program for adults without dependent children. From June 2004 to January 2007, the 
population of homeless single adults receiving public assistance dropped from over 
2,175 individuals to 373. By the end of January 2009, a total of 2,528 homeless 
CAAP recipients had been placed in permanent housing through the Care Not Cash 
Program cumulatively, and another 705 had found housing on their own. 

Housing First: In addition to the population impacted by Care Not Cash, the Human 
Services Agency master leasing program, called Housing First, also provides 
permanent housing for homeless single adults referred by emergency shelters and 
community-based agencies. The number of individuals placed into housing between 
January 1, 2004 and January 31, 2009 was 4,616. This number includes both Care 
Not Cash and non-Care Not Cash, Shelter Plus Care, and Local Operating Subsidy 
Program (LOSP) sites. 

Direct Access to Housing (DAH): The Department of 
Public Health operates the Direct Access to Housing 
Program, which provides permanent housing to formerly 
homeless persons with disabilities referred through the 
public health care system. The DAH program has housed 
a total of 1,225 single adults since January 2004. 

Fully Integrated Recovery Services Team (SF FIRST): 
Since the 2005 homeless count, San Francisco has 
increased outreach efforts to homeless persons living on 
the street who are not using available services. Services 
offered include case management, enrollment in food 
stamps, temporary stabilization housing, primary care, 
mental health and substance abuse treatment, and referral 
to permanent housing. From July 2007 to February 2009, SF FIRST has case 
managed 1,396 clients and engaged 267 in treatment. Since July 2005, they have 
permanently housed 567 people and linked 788 people to cash assistance programs 
(e.g., CAAP, Food Stamps, SSI, Veteran's Benefits, and State Disability). SF FIRST 
also manages stabilization rooms, temporary program rooms in single room 
occupancy hotels that are used to provide intensive case management services to the 
most vulnerable and chronic street homeless people. Case plans to move toward 
stability and follow through with case management are the key eligibility components 
of this program. 

Homeward Bound: The Homeward Bound Program (HBP) reunites homeless persons 
living in San Francisco with family and friends living elsewhere. Homeless clients 
who request to return home through this program must be living in San Francisco, 
and be medically stable enough to successfully travel to the destination. HBP staff 
directly contact the client's family member or friend at the point of destination to 




© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



VII. Conclusion 



San Francisco remains committed 

to providing housing and services 

through innovative and effective 

programs, to move individuals and 

families out of homelessness. 



ensure that the client will have a place to reside and have ample support to assist in 
establishing stabilized housing and transition from homelessness. A total of 3,646 
homeless individuals have been assisted by this program since February 2005. 

• Rental Subsidies and Rental Assistance for 
Homeless Families. Since 2007, 1 1 1 families have 
successfully transitioned off of the rental subsidy 
program. Another 194 families are currently 
receiving a rental subsidy. 

• Project Homeless Connect (PHC): Every other 
month over 1 ,000 community volunteers partner 
with city government, nonprofits, and the private sector to provide a one-stop 
clearinghouse of health and human services for homeless San Franciscans. Services 
include medical, mental health, substance abuse, housing, dental, benefits, legal, free 
eyeglasses, California ID, food, clothing, wheelchair repair, and more. The main goal 
of PHC is to transition the City's homeless off the streets and into permanent, 
supportive housing. To date, there have been 27 Project Homeless Connect events, 
including a special PHC for Homeless Veterans and Homeless Families, with 
between 1.800 and 2,000 clients served at each event. 

San Francisco remains committed to providing housing and services through innovative and 
effective programs, to move individuals and families out of homelessness. The completion of the 
2009 count provides HUD-required data for federal funding for San Francisco's Continuum of 
Care (CoC), a network of local homeless service providers that collaboratively plan, organize, 
and deliver housing and services to meet the needs of homeless people as they move toward 
stable housing and maximum self-sufficiency. These Homeless Assistance Grant funds (currently 
$19.8 million annually) provide much-needed resources to shelter, house, and serve the local 
homeless population under study in this report. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix A: Volunteer Instructions 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix A: Volunteer Instructions 



HOMELESS COUNT 2009: VOLUNTEER INSTRUCTIONS 

Welcome and thank you for volunteering for San Francisco's 2009 Homeless Count. 
The following instructions are provided for your use during the Count. Please follow 
these instructions carefully. 

TEAMS 

Teams must contain at least two persons, and at least one of the two people must 
be carrying a cell phone. Having a phone is for safety reasons. If you are 
volunteering alone and have not yet been matched up with a partner or team, we 
will find a partner for you. Generally, one team member takes responsibility for 
completing the tally sheet as the count proceeds, while the other(s) navigate the 
route and look for persons to count 

YOUR ROUTE 

Your team will be provided a route map. Each team is responsible for all of the 
square blocks within the outlined area (not only the periphery). When you get to the 
outer boundary of your map, cover that side of the street only (the side closest to the 
rest of your route). Do not cross the street. If there are stairs into a BART or MUNI 
station, walk down the stairs, into the station and record any homeless you observe. 
Count only the part of the station that is in your route. 

If you are driving and there is a BART or MUNI station on your route, please park 
and walk into the station. 

Some routes are notated with comments regarding known "hot spots" or 
encampments where homeless people are known to congregate. This information is 
provided so that you 1 ) will pay special attention to these areas and 2) so that you 
can exercise appropriate caution. Do not limit your count to these places. 

WHOM TO COUNT 

Counting requires subjective judgments as to who is homeless. The following 
factors should help you determine whom to count. 

Automatically Count: 

• People sleeping outside 

• Vehicles with windows covered (see below) 

• Tents, Makeshift structures, Boxes (see below for all of these) 

Do NOT Automatically Count 

• People engaged in illegal activities (drug activity, prostitution) 

• People leaving bars/other establishments 

• People waiting for buses 

Consider these as factors when deciding whether to count. Not everyone engaged in these 
activities is homeless. 

• Walking, sitting, or standing "with no purpose" (loitering) 

• Panhandling (with or without cup/sign) (This should be considered with 
other factors as not all panhandlers are homeless.) 

• Carrying bags/backpacks/garbage bags/suitcases/blankets/bedrolls 

1 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix A: Volunteer Instructions 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



• With shopping cart containing personal belongings 

• In possession of recycling, especially large numbers of items 

• Disheveled 

• Inebriated/passed out on sidewalk 

HOW TO COUNT 

SINGLES AND FAMILIES: 

For each person you see, as best you can fill out all information, as indicated on the tally 
sheet, for Gender, Race, Single or Family, and Age. There is a box for unknown. Use the key 
at the bottom of the tally sheet. If a person is a member of a family, at least one adult and a 
minor child, please fill out a line for each member of the family on the tally sheet. 

CARS (VEHICULARLY HOUSED) 

On some routes, many of the homeless persons counted will be living in cars, vans, 
trailers and campers. Use your judgment as to whether to count these bearing in 
mind the following criteria: 

• The vehicle's windows are covered 

• The vehicle is very crammed/cluttered 

• The vehicle is occupied but obviously not operational 

• The camper/trailer is not attached to a cab 

• The camper/trailer is parked in a desolate area and/or near an encampment 

Do not approach the vehicle or tap on the windows. Simply mark on the tally 
sheet if it is a car or a van/RV. RV will mean camper/trailer/etc. 

TENTS. OTHER STRUCTURES 

As with vehicles, do not approach. On the tally sheet indicate encampment by 
marking the column on the tally sheet. (With the encampments, it is the assumption 
that the homeless person(s) are inside the tents or structures and you cannot clearly 
identify any individuals.) Do not assume how many people aYe inside. Simply note 
on the tally sheet the encampment and number of structures/tents. 

ABANDONED BUILDINGS 

If you see an abandoned building, do not enter the building. If you hear people 
inside, or see lights on, please note that on your tally sheet. 

COMMERCIAL ESTABLISHMENTS 

If there is a commercial establishment on your route likely to attract homeless 
people (e.g. fast food restaurants, transportation depots), enter and count as safety 
allows. 

If you are on a driving route and see a commercial establishment that appears to have 
homeless inside or around, please get out and count. See further instructions below 
(under "driving routes"). 



PARKS 

Only enter parks if your map instructs you to do so. Some parks will be counted by 
City staff. Parks that you should NOT go into are indicated on your map. If you are 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix A: Volunteer Instructions 



on a driving route and cannot clearly see inside the park from your car, please get 
out and walk the perimeter to make your observations more clearly. 

ALLEYS 

Use caution when deciding whether to enter a "dead-end" alley. Only enter if it is 
well lit. If it is dark or appears dangerous, use your flashlight to scan for any 
homeless occupants. Observe as much as possible from a safe distance and make 
reasonable assumptions. 

ON-RAMPS 

If an on-ramp is part of your route, do not get on the freeway. If there is an 
encampment under the on-ramp, you are only responsible for counting people who 
are visible from the street on your route. Other parties will enter the on-ramps and 
go behind bushes or structures to count. 

DRIVING ROUTES 

If you are responsible for a driving route, you may, as time and safety precautions 
permit, decide to park your vehicle and walk part(s) of the route (e.g. commercial 
districts) to get a more accurate count. Do NOT exit your car in desolate areas. Use 
discretion in deciding whether to get out of your car. 

TALLYING YOUR COUNT 

You will be provided tally sheets for your route. Please fill out one line of the tally 
sheet for each person observed. Most of the information is check boxes or yes/no. 
Under location, please provide an intersection or street address where the person 
was observed. Please see the attached sample. 

Finally, please write the ROUTE NUMBER (indicated on your map) at the top of 
the tally sheet. 



SAFETY/EMERGENCIES 

Do not engage anyone during the course of the count. 

If an emergency arises while you participating in the Homeless Count, 
please dial 911. If you have a non-emergency question, please contact your 
dispatch center lead. 

If you are asked about your activities, you should reply "We're counting homeless 
persons so we can maintain funding for our City's homeless services," and continue 
on your way. 

Important Reminder: 

When you have completed your assigned route, return to your dispatch 
cente r. All maps, tally sheets, and equipment must be returned on the night of 
the count, no exceptions. 



2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix A: Volunteer Instructions 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix B: Tally Sheet 



Appendix B: Tally Sheet 



s 

c 

E 

o 

V* 
1S> 

1 

o 
*-» 

s 

en 


1 

Z 

o 




I 




















































■ 
o 

5- 


Si 

E 

| 

o 
>- 


-a 
E 

CD 

o 

1 

H 

£ 
§> 

i 

■as 

E 

o 

E 

1 

1 

E 

io 

il 

s ^ 


I 

a 

£ 

i 
1 

8 
£ 

1 
1 








2 




z 


z 


z 


= = 


Z 


33 s 


Z 


i a = 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


Z 


z 


z 


z 












1 


1 








































5 










































s 


i 
1 






















































z 


z 


z 


Z 


^ 


Z 


Z | Z 


Z 


2 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


z 


Z 


z 


z 


Z 












s 


- 




















































1 




















































1 




















































1 


















































'Transit! 
J Encamp 

structure' 
'Vehicle; 




















= 
















































Family must include 
at least one adult 

and one minor child. 




E 


"I 


















































1 




* 
























































■a 

1 

e 

o 


i 


= 




















































o 
6 


1 




O 
























































« 




















































- 




















































53 


# 


1 


< 

< 


s 






















l 




























m 
























































1 


s 


=> 




















































5 


1 


1 

1 




- 




















































- 




















































s 






















































Q 








rg 


CO 


■^ 




CO 


1 - 


GO 


























C, 


N 


og 


c^i 


CM 









© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix C: Survey Instrument 



Appendix C: Survey Instrument 



r 



84S140763B 



2009 SAN FRANCISCO HOMELESS COUNT SURVEY 



Interview Date; 



1 



Interviewer's (Your) Name: 


(Interviewer: Read question & 
answers to the respondent) 




Shade Circles Like This~> • 

Not Like This->^ g> 


(Office use) 
Respondent's Initials: First Middle Last 



1. What is your birth date? 
Month Day 



i i i 

(Office use) 



(Office use) 



(Office use) 



2. Which racial / ethnic group do you identify with the most? 
(Shade onh/1) 

O White/Caucasian O American Indian/ Alaskan Native 

O Black/Afncan Amenean O Asian 

O Pacific Islander 
O Other/Mult-ethnic 



O Hispanic/Labm 



3. How do you identify yourself? 

O Male O Female O Transgender 

4. Have you ever served In the United States Armed Forces 
(regular military, National Guard, or reserve unit)? 

O Yes (Continue with question 4a) 
O No (Skip to quos tionj) 
4a. What is your discharge status? 

O Honorable O Other tfian Honorable O Other 

O General O Dishonorable O Don't know 

5. Do you live alone without family, partner, or friends? 

O Yes (Skip to question 6) 

O No (Ask Question Sa) 

5a. Do you live with: (Shade all that apply) 

O Spouse or partner O Other family members) 

O Child/children O Fnend(s) 

O Parent or legal guardian O Other 

6. Where do you usually stay at night? ( Shade only 1) 

O Outdoors/streets/ parks O A P'ace in a house not 

O Unconverted Garage/atbc/basement "0"na"V used 'or sleeping 
O Backyard or storage s 



O Motel/hotel 



O Automobile 

O Van 

O Camper 

O Abandoned building 



(kitchen, living r 

O Emergency shelter 

O Public facilities (tram s 

bus depot transit cenl 
O Transitional housing 
O Other shelter 
O Other 



O Encampment 

How many people live there 7 



9. Where were you living at the time you most recently 
became homeless? (Shade only 1) 

Q San Francisco (Continue with quastion 9a) 

( O Alameda County 

O Contra Costa County 
■ O Marin County 

O San Mateo County 
I O Santa Clara County 
I O Other county in California 
[ Q Out of state 



' (Skip to question 9b) 



9a. How long had you lived in San Francisco before 
becoming homeless? (Shade only 1) 

O 7 days or less O 4 - 6 months O 3 - 5 years 

O B - 30 days O 7 - 1 1 months O6-10 years 

O 1 - 3 months O 1 - 2 years O More than 10 years 

(Skip to question 10) 



9b. What was the primary reason you 
(Shade only 1) 

O For a job / seeking work 



O i 



O To access V 

VA clinic 
O To access hi 
O I was forced 



to San Francisco? 

ess VA services and/or 



or grew up here 
O My family and/or friends are hen 
O I was traveling and got stranded 
O i visited and decided to stay 
O Weather / climate 
10. Immediately before you became homeless this last time, 
were you: (Shade only 1) 



community 
passing through 



O Other 



O Living in a home owned 

you or your partner 
O Renting a home or apa 


by 


O In jail orpnson 

O In a hospital 

O In a mental health 


O Staying with fnends 






O Living with parents/ relatives 
O Living in subsidized housing 


O In foster care 
O Other 



1 1 . What do you think is the primary event or condition 
that led to your homelessness? (Pleasa choose the 
main reason. Shade only 1 ) 



O L 






7. Is this the first time you have been homeless? 
O Yes (Skip to question 8) 

O No (Continue with question 7a and 7b) 

7a. In the last 12 months how many times have you been 
homeless, including this present time? (Shade only 1) 

O One time O 3 times O 5 bmes Q More ^ m 6 bmes 
O 2 bmes O 4 times O 6 times 

7b. In the last 3 years how many times have you been 
homeless. Including this present time? (Shade only 1 ) 
O One bme O 3 times O 5 times O More than 6 bmes 
O 2 bmes O 4 times O 6 bmes 

8. How long have you been homeless since you last lived 
in a permanent housing situation? ( Shade only 1 ) 

O 7 days or less O 4 months O B months O 12 months 
8-30 days O 5 months O 9 months O 1-2 years 

O 2 months O 6 months O 10 months O 2-3 years 

O 3 months O 7 months O 1 1 months O More than 3 year* 



O Eviction 

O Landlord sold/ stopped renbng 

or re-used property 
O Landlord raised rent 
O Alcohol or drug use 
O Lost my home to foreclosure 
O Illness or medical problem 
O Mental health issues 
O Argument/family or Inend askei 



O Hospital 

O Family/ 

O 

O Got too old for foster care 

O Divorced or separated 

O Hurricane Katnna 

O Other natural disaster/ fire/ flood 

O Asked to leave for being Lesbian, 

Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender 
O Other 



O Don't Know/ decline l 



L 



12. What is keeping you from getting permanent housing? 
(Shade all that apply) 



O Can't afford p 
O No job/ no income 
O No money for moving co* 
(secunty deposit, first 
and/or last month rent) 
O No housing available 



O No transportatior 
O Bad credit 
O Evicbon record 
O Cnmmal record 
O Don't want to 
O Other 



13. Are you currently using any of the following services/ 
assistance? ( Shade all that apply) 



O Emergency shelter 

O Transitional housing 

O Free meals 

O Food pantry 

O Bus passes 

O Project Homeless Connect 

O Shelter day services/ drop m cen 1 

O Case Management/ HOT Team 



O Job tr: 
O Legal ; 



O Mental health s 

O Alcohol/ Drug counseling 

O Other _ 



O Not using any 



_l 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix C: Survey Instrument 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



r 



0665407637 



(Office use) 



1 



14. Are you currently receiving any of the following forms 
of government assistance? [Shade all that apply) 

O Food Stamps O SSI (Supplemental Security Income) / SSDI 

OMedi-Caid/Medi-Care/ O CalWORKS/TANF 

MedlCal O VA Disability Compensation 

O Veteran's Benefits ~ ... 

O Other governmental assistance 

° WIC (State disability benefits, wortcers 

O Social Security compensation, unemployment, etc.) 

OCAAP/GA 

(If yes to any of these, go to question 15) 



t not currently receiving any of these 
fAsk question 14a) 



14a. If you are not receiving any government assistance, 
why not? (Shade all that apply) 

O Don't think 



O I have applied for one or more 
these services, and I am 
currently waiting for approval 

O Don't know where to go 

O Turned down 

O Will apply soon 

O Don't need government 



n eligible 
O Have no ID 
O No permanent address 
O No transportation 
O Never applied 
O Benefits were cut off 
O Immigration issues 
O I am afraid my children will O Paper work too difficult 
be taken away from me O Other 

15. What Is your total (gross) monthly income from all 
Government benefits? (County, State, Federal monies) 
( Shade on ly J) 

OZero O 5301 -WOO O $701- 5800 

O $1-5100 O $401 -$500 O$B01-$9D0 

O $101 -$200 O $501 -$600 O $901 -$1000 

O $201 -$300 O $601 -$700 O Over $1000 

16. Are you currently employed? (Shade only 1) 

O No, unemployed (Continua with 16a) 
O Yes, part time (Skip to question 17) 
O Yes, full time fSMp to Question 17) 

16a. What is keeping you from getting employment? 
(Shade all that apply) 

O Need education 

O Need training 

O Need clothing 

O No shower facilities 

O No phone 

O Physical health problems 

O Physical disability 



O Mental health problems 
O Mental disability 
O Criminal record 
O Alcohol /drug issue 



O No child care 

O Nd permanent address 

O No transportation 

O No tools for trade 

O No work permit (No S.S. #) 

O No photo Identification 

O Don't want to work 

O No jobs 

O Retired 



O Other _ 



17. Do you panhandle, or ask people for money or spare 
change? 

Q Yes (ContinuB with question 17a and 17b) 

O No (Skip to question 18) 

17a. How many days a month do you panhandle? 



_days 



17b. In a typical month, how much money do you 
make from panhandling (in dollars)? 



I I I 

(Office use) 



I I I I 



18. What are your other sources of income? 
(Shade all that apply) 

O Family / friends Q Selling other found items 

O Pension O Selling blood / plasma 

O Child support O Sex work 

O Recycling O Other 

19. What is your total (gross) monthly income from an 
non-Government sources? (Job, panhandling, recycling, 
elc -) O Zero O $301 - $400 O $701 - $80D 

O$1-$10D O $401 -$500 O $801 -$900 

O $101 -$200 O $501 -$600 O $901 -51000 

O $201 - $300 O $601 - $700 O Over $1 000 



20. Do you have any children, living with you or not? 

O Yes (Ask question 20a) 

O No (Skip to Question 21) 

20a. Do you have any children: (Shade all that apply) 

12 3 4 5 6+ 

O 1B or over living with you How many? O O O O O O 

O In foster care How many? O O O O O O 



O Under 18 living with you How many? O O O O O O 
Are they In school? O Yes O No O No. my kids are under 6 



21. Since you became homeless this last time, have you 
needed medical care and been unable to receive it? 

O Yes O No 

22. Where do you usually get medical care? 
(Shade only 1) 

O Hospital emergency room O Private doctor 

O Urgent care clinic O Friends / family 

O Public health clinic O Dontevergo 

O Veterans Affairs Clinic O Other 

O Free clinic/community clinic 
22a. How many times in the last 12 months have you used 
the emergency room for any treatment? 

tfmK i i i 

(Office use) 

23. How many nights, if any, have you spent in jail or 
prison during the last 12 months ? 



nights I 1 1 1 

(Office use) 

24. Are you currently on probation or parole? 

O Yes O No O Declined to state 

24a. Were you on probation or parole at the time you most 
recently became homeless? 
O Yes O No O Declined to state 

25. Are you currently experiencing any of the following: 



25a. Physical disability 
25b. Mental illness 
25c. Depression 
25d. Alcohol abuse 
25e. Drug abuse 
25f. Getting prescription 

medication 
25g. Domestic/partner 

violence or abuse 
25h. Chronic health 

problems 
25i. AIDS/HIV related 
illness 



O Yes O No O Declined to state 

O Yes O No O Declined to state 

O Yes O No O Declined to slate 

O Yes O No O Declined to state 

O Yes O No O Declined to state 

O Yes O No O Declined to state 

O Yes O No O Declined to state 

O Yes O No O Declined to state 

O Yes O No O Declined to state 



l_ 



25k. Developmental disability (A chronic condition that significantly 
limits a person's ability to speak, hear, see, walk, learn, or perform 
fundamental tasks) 

O Yes O No O Declined to state 

26. Were you ever In foster care? (Before your 18th birthday, 
were you ever removed from your home by the state, 
county, or court and sent to live with people other than 
your mother or father?) 

O Yes O No 

27. What is the highest level of education you have completed? 
O Less than 6th Grade O Technical Certificate 

O Less than high school diploma O AAV AS degree 
O BA/ BS degree 
O Advanced degree 
(master's, PhD, etc.) 
28. Do you usually get enough to eat on a daily basis? 
O Yes O Sometimes O No 



O High school diploma/GED 
O Some college, nD degree 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



J 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix C: Survey Instrument 



r 



6627490958 



Encuesta de Personas Desamparadas del 2009 
de San Francisco 



(Office 


USB' 













~l 



I I 1 



Fecha de la Entrevista:: 



Nombre del Entrevistador: 



Veclndario-lugar : 



Iniciales del Entrevistado: 1 Nombre 




(Entrevistador: Lea la pregunta y las 
opciones de respuesta) al entrevistado) 



Marque los circulos asi- 
y NO asi- 



1. Cual es su fecha de nacimiento? 
Mes Dia Ano _ 

i i i i i i 

(Office use) (Office use) (Office use) 

2. A que grupc etnlco/raclal considers Ud. que pertenece? 
( Marque solo 1 respuesta) 



i i i 



O Nahvo Ami 

O Asiatico 

O Islas del Pacifico 

O Otro/Multj-etnico 



no/Nativo de Alaska 



O Bleneo/Caucasico 
O Negro/A froamencano 
O Hispano/Latino 
3. Como se identifies usted? 

O Hombre O Mujer O Transgenero 

4. Presto servicio a las fuerzas armadas de los Estados 
Unidos? (Mihcia Regular, Guardia Naciona!, o en una 
unidad milrtar como Reservista) 
O Si (Continue con la pregunta 4a) 

O No (Vava a la prvQunta 5) 
4a. En que condiciones se retiro del servicio miiitar? 
O Honorable O Otro distinto a honorable O Otro 
O General O No honorable O No sabe 

5. Vive Ud solo, es decir sin familia, pareja o amigos? 

O Si (Vaya a la pnsounta Si 

O No (Slga con la pregunta Sa) 

5a. Actualmente Ud vive con: (Marque las que apliquen) 

O Esposo(a)/pan3ja O Otros miembros de la familia 

O Con ninos/hijos O Amigos 

O Padres o tutor legal O Otro 

6. Donde se queda Ud. generalmente en las noches? 
( Marque solo 1 respuesta) 

O A) aire IJbfe/calles/parques 
O Garaje/atjco/sotano sin modificaci 
O Pabo o estnjctura de bodega 
O Motel/hotel 



9. Donde estaba vrviendo la ultima vez que se convirtio t 
persona sin hogar? (Marque solo 1 respuesta) 

O San Francisco (Continue con la pregunta 9a) 



O Condado de Alameda 
O Condado de Contra Costa 
O Condado de Mann 
O Condado de San Mateo 
O Condado de Santa Clara 
O Otro condado en California 
O En otro estado 



(Vava a la pregunta 9b) 



9a. Cuanto tiempo habia vrvido en San Francisco antes de 
converttrse en persona sin hoqar? (Marque 1 respuesta) 

O 7 dlas o menos O « - 6 meses 3-5 anos 

O8-30dlas 07-11meses O6-10afios 

O 1-3 meses O 1-2 anos OMasdeiOaric 

(Vava a la pregunta 10) 



O Para acceder . 

O Para acceder a se 
para desamparad 



9b. Cual fue la principal razon que lo tra]o a San Francisco? 

(Marque solo 1 respuesta) 
O Por un trabajo / buscando trabajo 
O Yo naci y creel aqui 
O Mi familia y/o amigos vrven aqui 
O Estaba vtaiando y me dejaron aqui O Fui obligado a salirde mi 

antenor comunidad 
O Estaba de vislta y decldi ouedarme o Solamente estoy de paso 
O E clima o Otro 

10. Inmediatamente antes de convertirse en persona sin hogar 
esta ultima vez, usted estaba... : (Marque solo 1 respuesta) 



etc) 



O Vehiculo 
O Van 

O Camper 

O Edificio abandonado 



O Un lugar en unac 

normaimeme NO 

para dormir (cocir 
O Refugio de emergence 
O Lugares pubiicos (estacion 

oe tren o bus, transit center, 
O Hogar de paso/transitono 
O Otro tipo de refugio 

OOtJD 



O Vivtendo en un lugar 
suyo o de su pareja 
O Arrendando casa/apto 
O Quedandose con amigos 
O Vrviendo con familiares 
O Viviendo en un hogar subs 
O En una mstitucibn de saluc 



O En la carcel/pnsidn 

O En un hospital 

O Centra de rehabilitation de drogas 

O En un foster care 

OOtro 



11. Cual piensa Ud. que fue el principal evento o sttuaclbn 
que lo llevo a su actual condition de persona sin hogar? 



O CampamentD 

Cuanta gente vive alW> 



7. Es la primera vez que ha estado sin hogar/desamparado ? 
O Si (Vava a la pregunta 8) 
O No (Sloa con la pr&qunta 7a) 

7a. En los ultimos 12 meses cuantas veces, incluyendo esta, 
ha sido una persona sin hogar? (Marque solo 1 respuesta) 

O Una vez O 3 veces O 5 veces 
O 2 veces O 4 veces O 6 veces O Mas de 6 veces 
7b. En los ultimos 3 anos cuantas veces, incluyendo esta, 

ha sido una persona sin hogar? (Marque solo 1 respuesta) 
O Una vez O 3 veces O 5 veces 
O 2 veces O 4 veces O 6 veces O Mas de 6 veces 
8. Hace cuanto ha estado sin hogar desde la ultima vez que 
vivid en un hogar permanente? (Marque solo 1 respuesta) 
O 7 dias o menos O 4 meses O 8 meses O 12 meses 
O S -30 dlas O 5 meses O 9 meses O 1-2 ancs 

O 2 meses O 6 meses O 10 meses O 2-3 anos 

O 3 meses O 7 meses O 1 1 meses O Mas de 3 anos 



Escoja la principal r 

O Perdio ei trabajo 
O Orden de desalojc 
O La vrvienda fue vendida 

O Incremento de la renta 
O Use de alcohol o drogas 
O Perdio su casa por falta de dim 
O Enfermo o con probl medicos 
O Asuntos oe saiud mental 
O Pelea con familiar/ami go que 
que le pidid que se fuera 



(Marque solo 1 respuesta) 

O Violencia domestJca/familiar 

O Hospital izactdn/prog tratamiento 

O Haber estado encarceiado 

O Edad de salida del foster care 

O Se separo o divorce- 

O Huracan Katnna 

O Otro desastre natural / 



:io. i 



etc 



O Por ser homosexual, bisexual 
o transgenero 

O Otro 

O Nos 



abe/no desea respond 
12. Que es lo que le imptde poder tener un lugar para vlvir 
de manera permanente? (MarquB las que apliquen ) 



O Sin transports 

O Mai credito 

O Histona de desaiojo 

O Histona de crimen judicial 

O No desea hacerio 

OOtro 

13. Recibe alguna de las siguientes formas de asistencia? 
(Marque las que apliquen) 

O Refugio de emergence 



O No puede pagar ta renta 

O Sin trabajo / ingresos 

O Costos miciales de ranta 

(depdsito de segundad, 

pago del pnmer y/o ultimo 

nta) 



L 



O Hogar transitono 

O Ahmentos grabs 

O Food pantry 

O Fichas para el bus 

O Project Homeless Connect 

O Services dianos de refugio 

O Case Management/ HOT Team 



O Capacitacibn laboral 

O Asistencia legal 

O Servicios ae salud 

O Servicios de salud mental 

O Consejeria para alcohol/ drogas 

O Otro 

O Nol 






J 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix C: Survey Instrument 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



r 



4867490952 



(Office use) 



~l 



O SSI (Supplemental Security Income)/ 

SSDI 
O CalWORKS/ TANF 



14. Actual me me recibe alguna de las siguientes formas de 
asistencla gubemamental? (Marque las que apliquen) 

O Food Stamps 

O Medi-Caid/ Medl-Care 

MediCal 

O Beneficios para veteranosO VA Disability Compensaion 
O WIC O Otro tipo de asistencia del gobiemo 

O Seguro Social {Compensation laboral, desempleo, 

O CAAP/ GA beneficios del Estado por 

incapacidad etc.) 

(Si responde alguna de estas, va\ra a la pretjunta IS) 



O No recibo actualmente ninguna de estas (Slga con preq, 



Jl*l | 



14a. Por que no recibe ningun tipo de asistencia 
gubemamental? (Marque las que apliquen) 

O No cree que es eligible O Ha aplicado a uno o mas 

de estos servicios y esta 
O No tone ID esperando la aprobacion 

O Sin direction permanent^ q No sabe a donde jr 
O No Bene transports O Se lo nan negado 

O Nunca ha aplicado Q Va a apljcar pronto 

O Beneficios fueron recortados q No require asistencia del gobiemo 
O Asuntos de inmigracidn q Papeleo muy dificil 

O Me da miedo que me quieran 

quitar mis hijos O Olro 



15. Cual es el ingreso total mensual que recibe por parte de 
todas las organizaciones del Gobiemo ? (Condado, 
Estado, Federal) (Marque solo 1 respuesta) 

O Cero O J301 • 5400 O $701 - $800 

O $1 - $100 O $401 - $500 O $B01 - $900 

O $101 -$200 O $501- $600 O $901 -$1000 

O $201 - $300 O $601 - $700 O Mas de $1 000 

16. Esta Ud. actualmente empleado? (Maroue solo 1 respuesta) 

O No, desempleado rSios con la pmaunta 16a) 
O Si, tiempD parcial rVaya a la pmaunta 17) 
O Si, tempo complete ( Vara a la pmaunta 17) 

16a. Que es lo que lo detiene para poder estar empleado? 
( Marque las que apliquen) 

O No tienequien le cuide 



O Necesita educacidn 

O Necesita capacitacion 

O Necesita vestuano No Bene transport* 

O No tiene lugar para baflarse q Sin henamientas para trabajar 

O No tiene telefono Q Sin perm^ oe trabajo (S i n s S *) 

O Problemas de salud flsica o Sin documento de Identificacidn 

O Discapacidad fisica o No desea trabajar 

O Asuntos de alcohol/drogas O No hay trabajos 

O Historia de crimen judicial o Esta retirado/jubllado 

O Problemas de salud mental Q Esposo(a ) no quiere que trabaje 

O Discapacidad mental q otro 



17. Mendlga usted o pide dlnero a la gente < 
O Si (Siga con la pmgunta 17a) 
O No rVaya a la pmgunta 18) 

17a. Cuantos dias al mes Ud. mendiga ? 
dias 



i las calles? 



17b. En un mes tipicc, cuanto dinerojen dolares) 
consigue mendigando ? 



I I I 
(Office use) 



I I I 

(Office use) 



18. Cuales son sus otras fuentes de ingreso? 
(Marque las que apliquen) 

O Familia / amigos O Vendiendo objetos encontrados 

O Pension O Vendiendo sangre/ plasma 

O Apoyo por los hijos O Trabajo sexual 

O Reciclando O Otro 

19. Cual es el ingreso total mensual que recibe por parte de 
otras fuentes dlstintas al gobiemo? (Trabajo, 
mendigando, reclclaje, etc.) (Marque solo 1 respuesta) 

O Cero O $301 - $400 O S701 - $800 

O$1-$100 O $401 -$500 O $801 -$900 

O $101 - $200 O $501 - $600 O S901 - $1000 

O $201 -$300 O$601-$700 OMasde$1000 



L 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



20. Tiene Ud hijos vhriendo o no con usted? 

O Si (Siga con la oregunta 20a) 
O No (Vaya a la preqt/rrta 21) 
20a. Tiene Ud hijos que: (Marque las que apliquen) 



O Tienen 18 o mas 
O Estan en foster c 



lUd. 



Cuantos? O 
Cuantos? O 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 



l Ud Cuantos? O O O O O O 



Los hijos que viven con O Si 
Ud. estan en la escueta? O No 

O No. tienen r 



; de 6 aflos 



21. Desde que esta sin hogar esta ultima vez, ha necesitado 
atencidn medice y no le ha sido posible recibirla? 

O Si O No 

22. Generalmente donde obtiene atencl6n medlca? 
(Marque solo 1 respuesta) 

O Sala de emergence de Hospital O Doctor pnvado 
O Cllnica de urgencias O Amigos / famiiiares 

O Cllnica de salub pOblica O Nunca he Ido 

O Hospital para veteranos O Otro 

O Cllnica gratis/clinica comunltana 
22a. Cuantas veces en los ultimos 12 meses ha hecho uso de 
una sala de emergences para cualquter tipo de tratamlento? 



(Office use) 
23. Cuantas noches ha pasado en la carcel o prisi6n en 



los ultimos 12 meses ? 

noches 



i i i i 

(Office use) 



24. Se encuentra actualmente en libertad condicional? 

O Si O No O No desea responder 

24a. Estaba en libertad condicional en el momento en que 
reclentemente se convirti6 en persona sin hogar? 
O Si O No O No desea responder 

25. Esta Ud. pasando por alguna de las siguientes 
situaciones?: 



25a. Discapacidad fisica 
25b. Enfermedad mental 
25c. Depreslon 
25d. Abuso de Alcohol 
25e. Abuso de Drogas 
25f. Getting prescription 

medication 
25g. Violencia domestica 

o familiar 
25h. Problemas cronicos 

de salud 
25i. Enfermedades 

asociadas al SIDA/HIV 



O Si O No O No desea responder 

O Si O No O No desea responder 

O Si O No O No desea respondBr 

O Si O No O No desea responder 

O Si O No O No desea responder 

O Si O No O No desea responder 

O Si O No O No desea responder 

O Si O No O No desea responder 

O Si O No O No desea responder 



O Si O No O No desea responder 



25]. Desorden de estres 

post traumatico 
25k. Discapacidad del desarrollo (Condicion cronies que 
limita significativamente las habilidades de una persona para 
hablar, escuchar, ver, caminar o llevar 
a cabo tareas basicas O Si O No O No desea responder 

26. Alguna vez estuvo en un foster care o albergue temporal? 
(Pensando cuando tenia menos de 18 anos, fue Ud. removido 
de su hogar por el estado, el condado o una corte y enviado 
a vfvlr con personas distintas a su madre y su padre?) 

O Si O No 

27. Cual es el mayor nrvel educativo alcanzado? 

O Menos del sexto grado O Certificado tecnico 

O No terminb secundaria O Graduado de AA/ AS 

O Diploma de Secundaria/GED O Graduado de BA/ BS 

O Algo de College, sin tltulo O Titulo avanzado 

(Master's. PhD. etc.) 

28. En general, tiene suficiente para comer todos los dias? 

O Si O A veces O No ■ 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



Appendix D: Survey Results 

Please note that missing values (i.e., questions to which the survey respondent did not provide an 
answer) have been intentionally omitted from these survey results. In addition, some questions 
were asked only of a subset of the respondents, based on their response to a prior question. 
Therefore, the total number of respondents for each question may not equal the total number of 
surveys administered. 



1-Age 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


13- 17 years 


1 


0.2% 


18-21 years 


15 


2.8% 


22 - 30 years 


65 


12.2% 


31 -40 years 


112 


21.1% 


41-50 years 


192 


36.2% 


51-60 years 


126 


23.7% 


More than 60 years 


20 


3.8% 


Total 


531 


100.0% 


2. Which racial / ethnic group do you identify with the most? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


White / Caucasian 


198 


37.3% 


Black / African American 


184 


34.7% 


Hispanic / Latino 


79 


14.9% 


Other / Multi-ethnic 


38 


7.2% 


American Indian /Alaskan Native 


20 


3.8% 


Asian 


7 


1.3% 


Pacific Islander 


5 


0.9% 


Total 


531 


100.0% 


3. How do you identify yourself? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Male 


414 


78.4% 


Female 


108 


20.5% 


Transgender 


6 


1.1% 


Total 


528 


100.0% 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



4. Have you ever served in the United States Armed Forces? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Yes 


91 


17.2% 


No 


439 


82.8% 


Total 


530 


100.0% 


4a. If yes, what is your discharge status? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Honorable 


59 


67.0% 


General 


10 


11.4% 


Other than Honorable 


8 


9.1% 


Dishonorable 


3 


3.4% 


Other 


6 


6.8% 


Don't know 


2 


2.3% 


Total 


88 


100.0% 


5. Do you live alone without family, partner, or friends? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Yes 


396 


75.1% 


No 


131 


24.9% 


Total 


527 


100.0% 


5a. If no, do you live with: 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Friend(s) 


44 


36.1% 


Spouse or partner 


42 


34.4% 


Other family member(s) 


10 


8.2% 


Child / children 


7 


5.7% 


Parent or legal guardian 


2 


1.6% 


Other 


25 


20.5% 



Multiple response question with 122 respondents offering 130 responses. 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



6. Where do you usually stay at night? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Outdoors / streets / parks 


265 


50.3% 


Emergency shelter 


126 


23.9% 


Public facilities (train station, bus depot, transit center, 
etc.) 


27 


5.1% 


Motel / hotel 


22 


4.2% 


A place in a house not normally used for sleeping 
(kitchen, living room, etc.) 


20 


3.8% 


Other shelter 


13 


2.5% 


Automobile 


12 


2.3% 


Encampment 


7 


1.3% 


Van 


7 


1.3% 


Backyard or storage structure 


5 


0.9% 


Camper 


5 


0.9% 


Unconverted garage / attic / basement 


3 


0.6% 


Transitional housing 


3 


0.6% 


Abandoned building 


2 


0.4% 


Other 


10 


1.9% 


Total 


527 


100.0% 


7. Is this the first time you have been homeless? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Yes 


238 


44.6% 


No 


296 


55.4% 


Total 


534 


100.0% 


7a. If yes, in the last 12 months how many times hi 
present time? 


ive you been home 


'less, including this 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


One time 


348 


66.5% 


2 times 


57 


10.9% 


3 times 


30 


5.7% 


4 times 


5 


1.0% 


5 times 


9 


1.7% 


6 times 


6 


1.1% 


More than 6 times 


68 


13.0% 


Total 


523 


100.0% 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



7b. If yes, in the last 3 years how many times have you been homeless, including this present 
time? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


One time 


298 


57.0% 


2 times 


63 


12.0% 


3 times 


46 


8.8% 


4 times 


15 


2.9% 


5 times 


11 


2.1% 


6 times 


7 


1.3% 


More than 6 times 


83 


15.9% 


Total 


523 


100.0% 



8. How long have you been homeless since you last lived in a permanent housing situation? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


7 days or less 


5 


0.9% 


8 - 30 days 


8 


1.5% 


2 months 


20 


3.8% 


3 months 


20 


3.8% 


4 months 


13 


2.4% 


5 months 


9 


1.7% 


6 months 


24 


4.5% 


7 months 


8 


1.5% 


8 months 


8 


1.5% 


9 months 


18 


3.4% 


10 months 


5 


0.9% 


11 months 


5 


0.9% 


12 months 


22 


4.1% 


1 - 2 years 


64 


12.0% 


2 - 3 years 


61 


11.4% 


More than 3 years 


243 


45.6% 


Total 


533 


100.0% 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



9. Where were you living right before you most recently became homeless? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


San Francisco 


418 


78.3% 


Out of state 


46 


8.6% 


Other county in California 


37 


6.9% 


Alameda County 


15 


2.8% 


Contra Costa County 


7 


1.3% 


San Mateo County 


7 


1.3% 


Marin County 


3 


0.6% 


Santa Clara County 


1 


0.2% 


Total 


534 


100.0% 



9a. If you were living in San Francisco, how long had you lived in the City before becoming 
homeless? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


7 days or less 


68 


16.6% 


8 - 30 days 


4 


1.0% 


1 - 3 months 


15 


3.7% 


4 - 6 months 


14 


3.4% 


7-11 months 


9 


2.2% 


1 - 2 years 


33 


8.1% 


3 - 5 years 


52 


12.7% 


6- 10 years 


38 


9.3% 


More than 10 years 


176 


43.0% 


Total 


409 


100.0% 



9b. What was the primary reason you came to San Francisco? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


For a job /seeking work 


38 


24.2% 


My family and / or friends are here 


23 


14.6% 


I visited and decided to stay 


23 


14.6% 


I was traveling and got stranded 


18 


11.5% 


To access homeless services 


18 


11.5% 


Weather / climate 


8 


5.1% 


I was bom or grew up here 


7 


4.5% 


I was forced out of my previous community 


3 


1.9% 


I am just passing through 


3 


1.9% 


To access VA services and / or VA clinic 





0.0% 


Other 


16 


10.2% 


Total 


157 


100.0% 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



10. Immediately before you became homeless this last time, were you: 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Renting a home or apartment 


242 


45.4% 


Living with parents / relatives 


98 


18.4% 


Staying with friends 


68 


12.8% 


Living in a home owned by you or your partner 


53 


9.9% 


In jail or prison 


17 


3.2% 


Living in subsidized housing 


14 


2.6% 


In a substance abuse treatment program 


4 


0.8% 


In foster care 


2 


0.4% 


In a hospital 





0.0% 


In a mental health facility 





0.0% 


Other 


35 


6.6% 


Total 


533 


100.0% 


11. What do you think is the primary event that led to your homelessness? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Lost job 


134 


25.2% 


Alcohol or drug use 


81 


15.2% 


Argument / family or friend asked you to leave 


51 


9.6% 


Eviction 


28 


5.3% 


Divorced or separated 


26 


4.9% 


Incarceration 


24 


4.5% 


Mental health issues 


18 


3.4% 


Family / domestic violence 


18 


3.4% 


Don't know / decline to state 


14 


2.6% 


Landlord sold / stopped renting or re-used property 


10 


1.9% 


Illness or medical problem 


9 


1.7% 


Landlord raised rent 


8 


1.5% 


Lost my home to foreclosure 


7 


1.3% 


Death in family 


6 


1.1% 


Hospitalization / treatment program 


4 


0.8% 


Got too old for foster care 


3 


0.6% 


Hurricane Katrina 


3 


0.6% 


Other natural disaster / fire / flood 


3 


0.6% 


Asked to leave for being Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or 
Transgender 





0.0% 


Other 


85 


16.0% 


Total 


532 


100.0% 



2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



12. What is keeping you from getting permanent housing? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Can't afford rent 


275 


51.8% 


No job /no income 


232 


43.7% 


No money for moving costs (security deposit, first and / 
or last month rent) 


79 


14.9% 


No housing available 


74 


13.9% 


Don't want to 


32 


6.0% 


Criminal record 


24 


4.5% 


Eviction record 


17 


3.2% 


Bad credit 


10 


1.9% 


No transportation 


9 


1.7% 


Physical health problem 


5 


0.9% 


AOD (alcohol & other drugs) problems 


5 


0.9% 


Other 


64 


12.1% 


Multiple response question with 531 respondents offering 826 responses. 

13. Are you currently using any of the following services / assistance? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Free meals 


410 


77.8% 


Emergency shelter 


238 


45.2% 


Shelter day services / drop in center 


228 


43.3% 


Project Homeless Connect 


223 


42.3% 


Health services 


143 


27.1% 


Food pantry 


73 


13.9% 


Mental health services 


58 


11.0% 


Bus passes 


48 


9.1% 


Case management / SF FIRST (HOT) Team 


47 


8.9% 


Alcohol / drug counseling 


45 


8.5% 


Not using any services 


45 


8.5% 


Transitional housing 


20 


3.8% 


Legal assistance 


20 


3.8% 


Job training 


7 


1.3% 


Other 


10 


1.9% 



Multiple response question with 527 respondents offering 1615 responses 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



14. Are you currently receiving any of the following forms of government assistance? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Food Stamps 


202 


37.9% 


CAAP/GA 


113 


21.2% 


SSI (Supplemental Security Income) / SSDI 


112 


21.0% 


Medicaid / Medicare / Medi-Cal 


39 


7.3% 


Social Security 


35 


6.6% 


Veteran's benefits 


11 


2.1% 


Other governmental assistance (State disability benefits, 
workers compensation, unemployment, etc.) 


5 


0.9% 


VA disability compensation 


4 


0.8% 


CalWORKS/TANF 


3 


0.6% 


WIC 


2 


0.4% 


I am not currently receiving any of these 


182 


34.1% 


Multiple response question with 533 respondents offering 708 responses. 

14a. If you are not receiving any government assistance, why not? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Never applied 


33 


18.4% 


Don't think I'm eligible 


30 


16.8% 


Don't need government assistance 


30 


16.8% 


Have no identification 


25 


14.0% 


Will apply soon 


23 


12.8% 


Paper work too difficult 


17 


9.5% 


No permanent address 


15 


8.4% 


Turned down 


15 


8.4% 


Benefits were cut off 


13 


7.3% 


Immigration issues 


12 


6.7% 


I have applied for one or more of these services, and I 
am currently waiting for approval 


11 


6.1% 


Don't know where to go 


6 


3.4% 


No transportation 


1 


0.6% 


I'm afraid my children will be taken away from me 


1 


0.6% 


Other 


5 


2.8% 



Multiple response question with 179 respondents offering 237 responses. 



2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



15. What is your total (gross) monthly income from all government benefits? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Zero 


243 


46.6% 


$1 -$100 


70 


13.4% 


$101- $200 


23 


4.4% 


$201 - $300 


5 


1.0% 


$301 - $400 


19 


3.6% 


$401 -$500 


21 


4.0% 


$501 - $600 


8 


1.5% 


$601 - $700 


7 


1.3% 


$701 - $800 


8 


1.5% 


$801 -$900 


26 


5.0% 


$901 -$1000 


69 


13.2% 


Over $1000 


23 


4.4% 


Total 


522 


100.0% 


16. Are you currently employed? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


No, unemployed 


491 


92.3% 


Yes, part time 


30 


5.6% 


Yes, full time 


11 


2.1% 


Total 


532 


100.0% 



2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



16a. If no, what is keeping you from getting employment? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


No permanent address 


130 


26.6% 


Need clothing 


76 


15.6% 


No phone 


74 


15.2% 


Physical disability 


70 


14.3% 


No shower facilities 


66 


13.5% 


No jobs 


63 


12.9% 


Physical health problems 


59 


12.1% 


Alcohol / drug issue 


59 


12.1% 


Mental disability 


59 


12.1% 


Need training 


58 


11.9% 


No photo identification 


52 


10.7% 


Need education 


45 


9.2% 


Mental health problems 


42 


8.6% 


No transportation 


39 


8.0% 


Criminal record 


34 


7.0% 


Don't want to work 


27 


5.5% 


No work permit (No S.S. #) 


23 


4.7% 


No tools for trade 


13 


2.7% 


Retired 


11 


2.3% 


No child care 


5 


1.0% 


Spouse / partner doesn't want me to work 





0.0% 


Other 


33 


6.8% 


Multiple response question with 488 respondents offering 1,038 responses. 

17. Do you panhandle or ask people for money or spare change? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Yes 


172 


33.0% 


No 


350 


67.0% 


Total 


522 


100.0% 


17a. If yes, how many days a month do you panhandle? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


1 - 5 days 


52 


31.0% 


6 - 10 days 


28 


16.7% 


11 -20 days 


37 


22.0% 


21 - 25 days 


7 


4.2% 


More than 25 days 


44 


26.2% 


Total 


168 


100.0% 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



17b. If yes, in a typical month, how much money do you make from panhandling? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Less than $20 


38 


24.2% 


$21 - S50 


34 


21.7% 


$51 -$100 


36 


22.9% 


$101-3200 


26 


16.6% 


$201 - $300 


17 


10.8% 


More than $300 


6 


3.8% 


Total 


157 


100.0% 


18. What are your other sources of income? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Recycling 


117 


43.7% 


Family / friends 


87 


32.5% 


Selling other found items 


59 


22.0% 


Sex work 


18 


6.7% 


Selling blood / plasma 


7 


2.6% 


Pension 


6 


2.2% 


Child support 


3 


1.1% 


Other 


63 


23.5% 


Multiple response question with 268 respondents offering 360 responses 

19. What is your total (gross) monthly income from all non-government sources? 


Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Zero 


208 


40.1% 


$1-$100 


169 


32.6% 


$101 -$200 


38 


7.3% 


$201 - $300 


44 


8.5% 


$301 - $400 


18 


3.5% 


$401 - $500 


8 


1.5% 


$501 - $600 


5 


1.0% 


$601 - $700 


5 


1.0% 


$701 - $800 


5 


1.0% 


$801 - $900 


3 


0.6% 


$901 -$1000 


4 


0.8% 


Over $1000 


12 


2.3% 


Total 


519 


100.0% 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



20. Do you have any children, living with you or not? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Yes 


158 


29.6% 


No 


376 


70.4% 


Total 


534 


100.0% 



20a. If yes, do you have any children who are: 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


1 8 or over living with you 


10 


43.5% 


In foster care 


6 


26.1% 


Under 18 living with you 


11 


47.8% 



Multiple response question with 23 respondents offering 27 responses. 



20a1. If you have children, how many children 18 or over are living with you? 




Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


One child 


5 


50.0% 


Two children 


4 


40.0% 


Six or more children 


1 


10.0% 


Total 


10 


100.0% 



20a2. If you have children, how many children are in foster care? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


One child 


3 


50.0% 


Two children 


2 


33.3% 


Three children 


1 


16.7% 


Total 


6 


100.0% 



20a3. If you have children, how many children under 18 are living with you? 




Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


One child 


5 


45.5% 


Two children 


4 


36.4% 


Three children 


1 


9.1% 


Five children 


1 


9.1% 


Total 


11 


100.0% 



20b. If your children are under 18 and living with you, are they enrolled in school? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Yes 


6 


66.7% 


No 





0.0% 


No, my kids are under 6 


3 


33.3% 


Total 


9 


100.0% 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



21. Since you became homeless this last time, have you needed medical care and been unable 
to receive it? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Yes 


121 


23.1% 


No 


402 


76.9% 


Total 


523 


100.0% 



22. Where do you usually get medical care? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Hospital emergency room 


147 


28.2% 


Public health clinic 


139 


26.7% 


Free clinic / community clinic 


136 


26.1% 


Veterans Affairs Clinic 


26 


5.0% 


Urgent care clinic 


24 


4.6% 


Don't ever go 


23 


4.4% 


Private doctor 


8 


1.5% 


Friends / family 





0.0% 


Other 


18 


3.5% 


Total 


521 


100.0% 



22a. How many times in the last 12 months have you used the emergency room for any 
treatment? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Never 


183 


41.3% 


1 time 


105 


23.7% 


2 times 


75 


16.9% 


3 times 


35 


7.9% 


4 times 


20 


4.5% 


5 times 


3 


0.7% 


More than 5 times 


22 


5.0% 


Total 


443 


100.0% 



23. How many nights, if any, have you spent in jail or prison during the last 12 months? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


nights 


373 


74.0% 


1 - 5 nights 


71 


14.1% 


6-10 nights 


14 


2.8% 


11 -20 nights 


9 


1.8% 


21 - 50 nights 


17 


3.4% 


More than 50 nights 


20 


4.0% 


Total 


504 


100.0% 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



24. Are you currently on probation or parole? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Yes 


75 


14.4% 


No 


435 


83.3% 


Declined to state 


12 


2.3% 


Total 


522 


100.0% 



24a. Were you on probation or parole at the time you most recently became homeless? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Yes 


60 


11.9% 


No 


432 


85.7% 


Declined to state 


12 


2.4% 


Total 


504 


100.0% 



25. Are you currently experiencing any of the following: 





Yes 


No 


Declined 
to state 


25a. Physical disability 


36.5% 


62.7% 


0.8% 




184 


316 


4 


25b. Mental illness 


30.3% 


68.5% 


1.2% 




151 


342 


6 


25c. Depression 


54.7% 


44.0% 


1.3% 




286 


230 


7 


25d. Alcohol abuse 


32.3% 


66.9% 


0.8% 




163 


338 


4 


25e. Drug abuse 


31.1% 


67.7% 


1.2% 




155 


338 


6 


25f. Getting prescription medication 


34.3% 


65.2% 


0.4% 




169 


321 


2 


25g. Domestic / partner violence or abuse 


9.3% 


90.1% 


0.6% 




47 


454 


3 


25h. Chronic health problems 


33.7% 


66.1% 


0.2% 




170 


334 


1 


25i. AIDS / HIV related illness 


3.8% 


96.0% 


0.2% 




19 


474 


1 


25j. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 


29.4% 


69.0% 


1.6% 




147 


345 


8 


25k. Developmental disability (A chronic 
condition that significantly limits a person's 
ability to speak, hear, see, walk, learn, or 
perform fundamental tasks) 


12.4% 


86.2% 


1.4% 




63 


439 


7 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



26. Were you ever in foster care? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Yes 


88 


16.9% 


No 


433 


83.1% 


Total 


521 


100.0% 



27. What is the highest level of education you have completed? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Less than high school diploma 


135 


25.6% 


High school diploma / GED 


208 


39.5% 


Some college, no degree 


112 


21.3% 


AA/ AS degree 


19 


3.6% 


BA / BS degree 


21 


4.0% 


Technical Certificate 


13 


2.5% 


Less than 6th Grade 


9 


1.7% 


Advanced degree 


10 


1 9% 


Total 


527 


100.0% 



28. Do you usually get enough to eat on a daily basis? 



Response 


Frequency 


Percent 


Yes 


322 


61.5% 


Sometimes 


102 


19.5% 


No 


100 


19.1% 


Total 


524 


100.0% 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix D: Survey Results 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix E: Survey Administration Detail 



Appendix E: Survey Administration Detail 



The 2009 San Francisco Homeless Count Survey was administered by the trained 
survey team between February 4, 2009 and February 20, 2009. 

The refusal rate for participation in the survey, as documented by the survey team, 
was 5%. 

In all, the survey team administered 541 surveys. 

Seven surveys were removed from the survey sample, after screening for duplication 
was conducted by Applied Survey Research. 

The sample of valid surveys totaled 534. 

Of the 534 valid surveys, 491 (92%) were conducted in English. 

Of the 534 valid surveys, 43 (8%) were conducted in Spanish. 



2009 Applied Survey Research 



Appendix E: Survey Administration Detai 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



© 2009 Applied Survey Research 



2009 San Francisco Homeless Count and Survey 



Appendix F: Map of Supervisor Districts 
and Homeless Count Routes 



Appendix F: Map of Supervisor Districts and Homeless 
Count Routes 



City and County of San Francisco 




Legend 



Supervisor Districts 
Homeless Count Routes 




yf 




© 2009 Applied Survey Research